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U.S. House candidate Katie Arrington seriously hurt in wrong-way crash

Kathryn Ziesig/AP

U.S. House candidate Katie Arrington seriously hurt in wrong-way crash

Katie Arrington, a Republican congressional candidate in South Carolina is in the hospital with serious injuries after she was involved in a deadly wrong-way car crash Friday night.

Arrington was traveling in the passenger seat with a friend, when another driver traveling in the wrong direction hit their car, WSOC reports.

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The driver of the other vehicle died at the scene, according to Sheriff's Capt. Roger Antonio. The driver of Arrington’s car, her friend Jacqueline Goff, also sustained serious injuries.

Arrington and Goff were driving to Hilton Head, where Arrington was scheduled to receive an award Saturday morning, her campaign posted on Twitter.

Arrington has suffered a fracture to her back, broken ribs and a partial collapse of a main artery in her leg.

She will have undergo surgery and will require more procedures and weeks of recovery, CNN reports.

Arrington is alert and recovering at the Medical University of South Carolina and her family is by her side.

President Donald Trump expressed his sympathies to Arrington via Twitter.

Arrington defeated U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford in his re-election bid last week.

Sanford also expressed his well-wishes to Arrington on Twitter.

Arrington’s Democratic opponent, Joe Cunningham, announced Saturday morning that he's suspending his campaign out of respect for Arrington's recovery.

“As we all know, Katie Arrington is an extremely strong woman and has tremendous faith and an incredibly supportive family," her campaign said on Twitter.

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High number of cancer cases among Florida high school friends prompts doctor to urge investigation

A  Florida oncologist and 2003 Satellite High School graduate is asking questions after she and several of her former classmates were diagnosed with cancer.

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Dr. Julie Greenwalt, of the Baptist MD Anderson Cancer Center in Jacksonville battled a rare, aggressive form of appendix cancer.

She first contacted the Florida Department of Health about one year ago to ask the agency to take a closer look at the cancer cases. Her resolve was strengthened after a recent Military Times article about the detection of water contaminates linked to cancer and developmental delays in children at military bases nationwide, including Patrick Air Force Base.

Greenwalt asked Victoria Hicks, a friend and fellow Satellite High School alumna, to discuss her breast cancer diagnosis with the health department.

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"I was 33, and I had no family history," Hicks said. "I went to the doctor nine months before my actual diagnosis and was told it's nothing, it's no big deal, and it grew into an 8-centimeter mass."

Greenwalt said the pattern of cancer diagnoses is concerning.

"I think it's an abnormal pattern that so many young people in their 30s are getting cancer without family history," she said. "I'm not trying to cause any panic, just trying to create awareness that there might be a problem."

Officials with the FDOH said although the agency hasn't launched a formal investigation, it recognizes the importance of gathering and assessing information that could help determine necessary next steps.

Greenwalt said current and former Brevard County residents who have been diagnosed with cancer are asked to contact the county health department's epidemiologist to provide details of their diagnosis and related information.

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Relatives of patients who have died from cancer are also asked to report that information to the agency.

"I just feel grateful to be alive, and I know that God has a plan for my life," Greenwalt said. "(Perhaps) this is part of it -- to try and help figure this out."

She said she plans to organize a community meeting in Satellite Beach to increase awareness.

"I hope now that it's out there, the possibility of people getting screened sooner can help save more lives," Hicks said.

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