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Posted: February 23, 2018

Teachers to Trump: #ArmMeWith funding, supplies and resources, not guns

Firearm instructor Clark Aposhian teaches a concealed-weapons training class to 200 Utah teachers in 2012. In 2018, in the wake of a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, some teachers are saying they need resources, not guns.
George Frey/Getty Images
Firearm instructor Clark Aposhian teaches a concealed-weapons training class to 200 Utah teachers in 2012. In 2018, in the wake of a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, some teachers are saying they need resources, not guns.

By Fiza Pirani, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Teachers around the nation are using the hashtag #ArmMeWith on social media to push for an increase in what they say they really need in schools: funding, mental health resources, school supplies and books, not guns.

The #ArmMeWith movement is a reaction to President Donald Trump’s call for some teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools, even proposing that teachers receive bonuses for helping with security. Trump made the statements following the Parkland, Florida, school shooting last week that claimed the lives of 17 people.

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Some educators, such as Utah teacher Kasey Hansen, said carrying a concealed weapon in school is “more of a solution” than hiding in a corner and waiting if an armed intruder enters the classroom. 

But others, including the president of the 1.7 million-member American Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, called arming teachers a horrible idea and said an educator’s handgun would be no match for the assault-style weapons often wielded by attackers.

“The solution is to ban these military weapons from people who shouldn't have them,” Weingarten said.

Related: Alabama Sen. Doug Jones calls arming teachers ‘the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard’

“Teachers already shoulder a huge burden when it comes to educating properly, due to lack of funding, support and resources and making sure their students are taken care of emotionally,” Brittany Wheaton, an English teacher in Utah, told CNN. “Asking us to now carry the burden of having the responsibility to kill is irreparably damaging, even if we never have to discharge our weapon.”

Wheaton, along with Kansas teacher Olivia Bertels, launched the movement. According to BuzzFeed, the two met through Instagram and have individually developed significant followings on the platform, often sharing snapshots of their classrooms and inspirational messages.

Following the Florida high school shooting, Wheaton reached out to Bertels said it was “time for teachers to demand their voices be heard.”

Here’s a look at the burgeoning social media movement:


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