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Government shutdown: Pelosi asks Trump to postpone State of the Union address

The partial government shutdown that began Dec. 22 continues as a stalemate between President Donald Trump and congressional leaders over his demand for more than $5 billion to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

>> Read more trending news

Update 2:35 p.m. EST Jan. 16: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Wednesday that despite the partial government shutdown, federal officials are prepared to deal with issues that might arise when Trump delivers his State of the Union address later this month.

“The Department of Homeland Security and the US Secret Service are fully prepared to support and secure the State of the Union,” Nielsen said in a statement posted on Twitter.

Her comments came after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked the president to delay the address, scheduled January 29, due to security concerns as the shutdown dragged into its 26th day.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: TSA: “Financial limitations” causing airport screeners not to show up for work

Update 10:25 a.m. EST Jan. 16: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday asked Trump to delay his State of the Union address, which is expected later this month, as the partial government shutdown continues.

>> Pelosi asks Trump to postpone State of the Union amid shutdown

“Given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened for this address or for you to consider delivering your State of the Union address in writing to the Congress on January 29th,” Pelosi said in a letter sent Wednesday.

Update 1:41 p.m. EST Jan. 15: A federal judge has denied a request from unionized federal employees who filed a lawsuit requiring the government pay air traffic controllers who are working without pay during the shutdown, CNN reported.

>> FDA restarts inspections during shutdown, inspectors working without pay

Update 1:45 p.m. EST Jan. 14: A group of federal employees who was ordered to work without pay amid the ongoing shutdown filed suit last week against the government, comparing their situations to involuntary servitude and accusing Trump and other officials of violating the 13th Amendment, according to The Washington Post.

In the lawsuit, filed Wednesday by four federal workers from Texas and West Virginia who are employed by the departments of Justice, Agriculture and Transportation, attorneys said the workers could face discipline or removal if they failed to continue working despite the fact that they were not getting paid during the shutdown. The Post reported the lawsuit also accused officials of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act.

>> Atlanta airport security lines more than an hour long amid federal shutdown

“Our plaintiffs find themselves in the exact same boat as virtually every other furloughed federal employee: bills to pay and no income to pay them,” the workers' attorney, Michael Kator, told the Post. “As this drags on, their situation will become more and more dire.”

The partial government shutdown entered its 24th day Monday, making it the longest in history. The second-longest government shutdown lasted 21 days in the mid-90s, during President Bill Clinton's time in office.

Update 9:05 a.m. EST Jan. 14: Trump railed against Democrats on Monday morning as the partial government shutdown entered its 24th day.

"I've been waiting all weekend," Trump wrote Monday in a tweet. "Democrats must get to work now. Border must be secured!"

The House, which is controlled by Democrats, has passed six bills to re-open government agencies closed by the partial government shutdown, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump heads to see farmers with shutdown in fourth week

Senator Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated earlier this month that he would not bring funding bills passed by the House before the Senate, as the president has signaled several times that he would not sign a spending bill that failed to fund his border wall.

"The package presented yesterday by Democratic leaders can only be seen as a time wasting act," he said on Jan. 3.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Jan. 11: Trump said Friday that it would be easy for him to declare a national emergency to get a wall along the country’s southern border built, but that he has no plans to do so.

“I’m not going to do it so fast,” the president said during a discussion about border security with state, local and community leaders at the White House. “This is something that Congress can do.”

Some 800,000 workers, more than half of them still on the job, will miss their first paycheck on Friday, and Washington is close to setting a dubious record for the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

Update 1:25 p.m. EST Jan. 10: Trump said Thursday he will not travel later this month to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum amid the ongoing partial government shutdown.

The president was scheduled to leave for the trip Jan. 21.

“Because of the Democrats intransigence on Border Security and the great importance of Safety for our Nation, I am respectfully cancelling my very important trip to Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum,” Trump wrote Thursday afternoon on Twitter. “My warmest regards and apologies to the @WEF!” 

Last year, a brief government shutdown threatened to derail his trip to Davos, where he asserted that his "America First" agenda can go hand-in-hand with global cooperation.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is leading the U.S. delegation to the annual Davos event, which courts high-profile businesspeople and political figures and other elites. Other members of the Cabinet are scheduled to attend as well as Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Update 9:05 a.m. EST Jan. 10: Trump will travel Thursday to Texas to visit the southern border after negotiations to end the partial government shut down crumbled.

The president walked out of discussions Wednesday with Congressional leaders after Democrats again refused to approve of $5.7 billion of funding for his border wall.

“The Opposition Party & the Dems know we must have Strong Border Security, but don’t want to give ‘Trump’ another one of many wins!” Trump wrote Thursday on Twitter.

The president is set to travel to McAllen on Thursday, where he plans to visit a border patrol station for a roundtable on immigration and border security.

Update 3:40 p.m. EST Jan. 9: The president walked out of discussions with leaders in the House and Senate on Wednesday amid the ongoing government shutdown.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the president asked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi whether she would agree to fund his border wall and that he walked out of the meeting when she answered in the negative.

“He said, ‘If I open up the government, you won’t do what I want,’” Schumer said.

The president wrote on Twitter that the meeting was “a total waste of time.”

“I asked what is going to happen in 30 days if I quickly open things up, are you going to approve Border Security which includes a Wall or Steel Barrier?” he wrote. “Nancy said, NO. I said bye-bye, nothing else works!”

Update 2:35 p.m. EST Jan. 9: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republicans are standing beside the president Wednesday as the debate over border wall funding continues.

Trump and Vice President Mike Pence met with Senate Republicans for their party lunch Wednesday afternoon.

“The Republicans are unified,” Trump told reporters after the meeting. “We want border security. We want safety for our country.”

The president accused Democrats of blocking funding for the wall, “because I won the presidency and they think they can try and hurt us.” Democrats have called the proposed wall costly, ineffective and "immoral" and say Trump's "manufacturing a crisis."

Trump and Pence are scheduled to meet at 3 p.m. with House and Senate leaders from both parties at the White House.

Update 1:30 p.m. EST Jan. 9: Trump said Wednesday that his border wall has "tremendous Republican support” ahead of a meeting with GOP lawmakers as the shutdown drags into its 19th day.

"I think we're going to win,” Trump said. “We need border security, very simple.”

In response to a reporter’s question about how long the president would be willing to let the shutdown last in order to secure funding for the wall, Trump said, “whatever it takes.”

Update 12:50 p.m. EST Jan. 9: During a bill signing at the White House on Wednesday, the president pushed again for funding of his border wall, arguing that human trafficking can’t be stopped without it.

"As long as we have a border that is not secure, we're going to suffer the consequences of that," Trump said.

The president brushed off critics who have said a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border would be ineffective to address immigration issues.

“They say a wall is a medieval solution, that’s true,” Trump said. “It worked then, it works even better now”

Democrats have called Trump's promised wall costly, ineffective and "immoral" and say he's "manufacturing a crisis."

The bill Trump signed is designed to enhance an annual State Department report that measures global efforts to eliminate human trafficking.

Update 10:35 a.m. EST Jan. 9: Officials will hold a series of meetings Wednesday in an attempt to end the government shutdown that began 19 days ago, according to Politico.

The president, Vice President Mike Pence and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen will meet Wednesday afternoon with Senate Republicans for their party lunch, the news site reported. Then, at 3 p.m., the president will meet with House and Senate leaders from both parties at the White House, Poliltico reported, noting it will mark “the third such bipartisan meeting in a week’s time.”

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters Wednesday morning that Trump is still considering the possibility of declaring a national emergency to get the wall built.

"(It's) something we're still looking at, something that's certainly still on the table," she said, according to Bloomberg News. "The best solution is to be able to work with Congress to get this done."

The president did not mention the possibility of declaring a national emergency to get the wall built Tuesday night, during his first address from the Oval Office. He wrote Wednesday morning on Twitter, “we MUST fix our Southern Border!”

Trump is scheduled to visit the border Thursday.

Update 10:50 p.m. EST Jan. 8: In his first ever televised Oval Office address, President Donald Trump urged congressional Democrats to fund his border wall Tuesday night, blaming illegal immigration for the scourge of drugs and violence in the U.S. 

Democrats in response accused Trump appealing to “fear, not facts” and manufacturing a border crisis for political gain.

He argued for spending some $5.7 billion for a border wall on both security and humanitarian grounds as he sought to put pressure on newly empowered Democrats amid the extended shutdown.

He will visit the Mexican border in person on Thursday.

Update 8:07 p.m. EST Jan. 8: The New York Times is reporting that Trump will not declare a national emergency this evening in order to circumvent Congress to get funds to build the wall. According to the times, “administration officials who had seen a draft copy of his speech said the president was not preparing to do so.”

Update 10:45 a.m. EST Jan. 8: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer will deliver the Democratic response to Trump's planned prime time address, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree.

Update 1:50 p.m. EST Jan. 7: Trump said he plans to address the nation Tuesday night as Democrats continue to stand firm on their refusal to fund the president’s border wall.

“I am pleased to inform you that I will Address the Nation on the Humanitarian and National Security  crisis on our Southern Border Tuesday night at 9 P.M. Eastern,” Trump said Monday afternoon in a tweet.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: Trump to visit Mexican border as White House pushes for security funding

The announcement came after White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump plans to visit the southern border on Thursday.

Update 1:40 p.m. EST Jan. 7: Trump on Thursday will visit the southern border amid the ongoing shutdown impasse, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said.

Update 9:10 a.m. EST Jan. 7: The partial government shutdown entered its 17th day Monday with no end in sight despite meetings over the weekend meant to help bring the shutdown to a close, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Update 3:30 p.m. EST Jan. 4: Trump said Friday that he’s considering using his executive authority to get a wall built on the U.S.-Mexico border.

“We can call a national emergency because of the security of our country, absolutely,” Trump said. “I haven’t done it. I may do it.”

The president spoke with reporters Friday after meeting with congressional leaders amid the ongoing budget impasse. He said he’s designated a team to meet over the weekend with lawmakers to resolve the standoff. 

Update 2:40 p.m. EST Jan. 4: At a news conference Friday, Trump confirmed he told congressional leaders that he would be willing to allow the government shut down to continue for months or years if Democrats refuse to fund his border wall.

“I don’t think (the government will remain closed that long) but I am prepared,” Trump said. “I hope it doesn’t go on even beyond a few more days.”

Trump met with top leaders from the House and Senate on Friday morning to discuss the ongoing partial government shutdown and his demand for $5.6 billion to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump: Shutdown could go ‘months or even years’ in border wall dispute

The president said Friday’s meeting was “very, very productive,” though top Democrats told reporters after the meeting that little was accomplished.

“How do you define progress in a meeting?” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked reporters after the meeting. “When you have a better understanding of each other’s position? When you eliminate some possibilities? If that’s the judgement, we made some progress.”

Update 1:40 p.m. EST Jan. 4: Top Democrats said a meeting with Trump aimed at bringing the ongoing partial government shutdown to an end was contentious on Friday, with neither side willing to budge in the ongoing battle over funding for a border wall.

“We told the president we needed the government open," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters after the meeting. "He resisted. In fact, he said he'd keep the government closed for a very long period of time -- months or even years."

Update 9:20 a.m. EST Jan. 4: Trump is set to meet Friday morning with congressional leaders, though it was not clear whether the meeting would help bring to an end the partial government shutdown that began nearly two weeks ago.

The meeting, scheduled to take place at 11:30 a.m., will include newly sworn House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top leaders from the House and Senate, NPR reported

House Democrats approved of a spending bill Thursday to re-open the government, prompting a veto threat from Trump.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump threatens vetoes as House passes bills to end partial shutdown

“If either H.R. 21 or H.J. Res. 1 were presented to the President, his advisors would recommend that he veto the bill,” the White House said in a veto threat against the plans passed by House Democrats in the opening hours of the 116th Congress, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Update 11:45 p.m. EST Jan. 3: House Democrats have approved a plan to re-open the government without funding President Donald Trump’s promised border wall. 

The largely party-line votes by the new Democratic majority came after Trump made a surprise appearance at the White House briefing room to pledge a continued fight for his signature campaign promise. 

The Democratic package to end the shutdown includes a bill to temporarily fund the Department of Homeland Security at current levels through Feb. 8 as bipartisan talks continue. 

It was approved, 239-192.

Update 11:15 p.m. EST Jan. 2: President Donald Trump said he remains “ready and willing” to work with Democrats to pass a government spending bill even as he refuses to budge over funding for his long-promised border wall. 

Trump tweeted “Let’s get it done!” as the partial government shutdown continues with no end in sight.

Trump has invited the group back for a follow-up session Friday, the day after Nancy Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House.

Earlier, they met Trump at the White House Wednesday for a briefing on border security.

The session did not yield any breakthroughs according to The Associated Press, and Democrats said they remained committed to introducing the legislation Thursday. The administration has so far rejected the plan, which does not include funding to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Schumer said Trump could not provide a “good answer” for opposing the bills. He added that Trump and Republicans “are now feeling the heat.”

Update 9:30 a.m. EST Jan. 2: Congressional leaders are expected to attend a briefing on border security Wednesday at the White House as the partial government shutdown continues, The Associated Press reported.

Among the lawmakers expected to attend the meeting are Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, according to the AP. Top incoming House Republicans, Kevin McCarthy of California and Steve Scalise of Louisiana, are also expected to attend.

The meeting is scheduled to take place at 3 p.m., The Wall Street Journal reported.

The newspaper noted that few, if any, compromises are likely to be offered at the session, which comes one day before Democrats take control of the House of Representatives.

Update 5 p.m. EST Jan. 1: Trump has invited congressional leaders to a border security briefing scheduled for Wednesday. The Associated Press reported the top two Democrats and Republicans from both the House and Senate have been invited. Other possible attendees and agenda have not been released.

The White House has not commented on the apparent invitations, the AP reported.

Update 12:35 p.m. EST Dec. 28: Trump threatened Friday to close the southern U.S. border if Democrats continued to refuse to fund his border wall.

“We build a Wall or we close the Southern Border,” he said in a series of tweets Friday morning.

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney told Fox News on Friday that Trump had canceled his plans for New Year’s Eve in light of the ongoing shutdown. Still, Drew Hammill, spokesman for House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, told The Associated Press on Friday that Democrats won’t fund the president’s “immoral, ineffective expensive wall.”

“While we await the President’s public proposal, Democrats have made it clear that, under a House Democratic Majority, we will vote swiftly to re-open government on Day One,” Hammill said.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Dec. 27: The partial government shutdown that started Saturday is expected to last into the new year. 

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise said in a statement obtained Thursday by C-SPAN that no votes were expected in the U.S. House of Representatives this week as the shutdown continues.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll released Thursday showed 47 percent of Americans hold Trump responsible for the partial government shutdown, despite the president’s assertion that Democrats are at fault.

The poll found 33 percent of adults blame Democrats in Congress.

In a pair of tweet Thursday, the president accused Democrats of “obstruction of the needed Wall.”

Update: 3:35 p.m. EST Dec. 25: President Trump spoke to members of the five branches of the U.S. military via video conference Tuesday, sending them his well-wishes before discussing the partial government shutdown and the country's need for a wall: 

“I can tell you it's not going to be open until we have a wall, a fence, whatever they would like to call it."

Update 3:50 p.m. EST Dec. 23: Incoming chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday” that the shutdown could continue into the next year.

“It is very possible that the shutdown will go beyond the 28th and into the new Congress,” Mulvaney said.

Update 3:55 p.m. EST Dec. 22: The Senate does not estimate a vote on a deal to end the partial government shutdown until next Thursday at the earliest, tweeted Jamie Dupree, Cox Media Group Washington correspondent.

The Senate Cloakroom, a Twitter account for the Republican side of the Senate floor, tweeted the following schedule for the Senate: “Following today’s session, the Senate will convene on Monday, December 24th at 11:00 am for a Pro Forma Session. Following the Pro Forma Session, we will next convene at 4:00 pm on Thursday, December 27th and consider business if a deal has been reached on government funding”

President Trump has been active on Twitter today, saying he’s in the White House today “working hard,” and reaffirming his support for tough border security.

“I won an election, said to be one of the greatest of all time, based on getting out of endless & costly foreign wars & also based on Strong Borders which will keep our Country safe. We fight for the borders of other countries, but we won’t fight for the borders of our own!” the President tweeted.

Update 3:00 p.m. EST Dec. 22: White House officials are warning that the government shutdown will last through the holidays, as Trump is not relenting on his demand, tweeted New York Times White House correspondent Katie Rogers. "We have continued to put forth what we think is an important expectation ... which is $5 billion in border security," a senior White House official told reporters, according to Rogers’ tweet.

Update 12:30 p.m. EST Dec. 22: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave an update on government funding negotiations. He said a procedural agreement was made to “create space” to allow discussions between Senate Democrats and White House. There will be no votes until Trump and Senate Democrats reach an agreement.

Update 9:06 a.m. EST Dec. 22: The Senate is expected to meet today at noon to see if they can hammer out an agreement that President Trump will sign.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told press Friday night that “constructive talks are underway," for such an agreement, reported CNN.

If any new deal is announced, lawmakers would be given 24 hours notice to return to Washington for a vote.

Update 1:31 a.m. EST Dec. 22: In a joint statement released shortly after the partial government shutdown went into effect, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y,) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) were critical of President Donald Trump and called the government closures the “Trump shutdown.”

"President Trump has said more than 25 times that he wanted a shutdown and now he has gotten what he wanted," Schumer and Pelosi said in the statement. “Democrats have offered Republicans multiple proposals to keep the government open, including one that already passed the Senate unanimously, and all of which include funding for strong, sensible, and effective border security -- not the president’s ineffective and expensive wall.

“If President Trump and Republicans choose to continue this Trump Shutdown, the new House Democratic majority will swiftly pass legislation to re-open government in January.”

Update 10:45 p.m. EST Dec. 21: With a partial government shutdown expected at midnight, White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney instructed agencies to plan for a shutdown.

Mulvaney says in a memo for government executives that “we are hopeful that this lapse in appropriations will be of short duration” but that employees should report to work when scheduled to “undertake orderly shutdown activities.”

Update 8:19 p.m. EST Dec. 21: The Senate adjourned without a deal on spending, just after 8 p.m. Friday evening ensuring a partial government shutdown at midnight Friday.

Senators expect to return at noon Saturday as talks continue.

Update 7:09 p.m. EST Dec. 21: The House adjourned Friday evening and will return Saturday at noon which will likely trigger a partial shutdown.

Update 5:55 p.m. EST Dec. 21: With just over 6 hours left until the midnight deadline, Vice President Pence’s tie-breaking vote advanced the 47-47 tally after a marathon, five-hour voting session in the Senate that dragged on as senators rushed back to Washington.

The move doesn’t immediately end the threat of a partial federal shutdown, but it kick-starts negotiations as Congress tries to find a resolution to Trump’s demand for the wall.

Senators say they won’t vote on a final bill to fund the government until Trump and congressional leaders all agree to a deal.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Dec. 21: Trump spoke with reporters before signing a criminal justice reform bill Friday. 

"It's possible that we'll have a shutdown,” the president said. “I think the chances are probably very good because I don't think Democrats care so much about maybe this issue, but this is a very big issue”

The Republican-led House approved funding Thursday for Trump's border wall and sent the bill to the Senate.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: With impasse over wall funding, federal workers gear up for shutdown

Senators are holding a procedural vote Thursday afternoon to determine whether to move forward with the bill.

During a meeting with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer last week, Trump said he’d shut down the government if lawmakers failed to secure $5 billion in funding for a wall to span the U.S.-Mexico border.

“If we don’t have border security, we’ll shut down the government,” Trump said. “I’m going to shut it down for border security.”

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Update 10:20 a.m. EST Dec. 21: White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the officials plan to discuss “the funding bill and the importance of border security” at 10:30 a.m.

The president insisted on Twitter Friday morning that, “The Democrats now own the shutdown!”

Ten days earlier, Trump said during a meeting with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer that he would be “proud to shut down the government for border security.”

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Original report: A potential government shutdown looms and President Donald Trump is tweeting, saying that if a spending plan isn’t passed and signed by midnight, it will be the Democrats fault when the government closes.

On Thursday night, after a meeting between House Republicans and the president, the House passed a spending bill that included $5 billion for Trump’s border wall. 

>>From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: With Friday night deadline, funding fight shifts to Senate

The vote was 217-185, CNN reported.

The bill is in the hands of the Senate whose members have to act on it before the midnight deadline or the government closes. 

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Shutdown chances jump as Trump demands money for his border wall

Washington watchers believe the bill will not pass because of the money earmarked for the wall, CNN reported

Democrats have said they will not support the money for the border and both sides of the Senate aisle are needed if the spending plan is to pass.

>> Government shutdown: What will close; will you get your Social Security check, SNAP, WIC?

In a series of morning tweets by the President, he placed the blame on Democrats if the government shuts down.

The president said he would not sign the Senate-backed spending bill that does not include money for the border wall. The Senate plan would grant funding to keep the government operating until Feb. 8, The Washington Post reported

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Government shutdown could affect Super Bowl ads, travel

The partial government could have an unintended or unrealized consequence when you’re watching the Super Bowl next month.

Since the Federal Communications Commission has suspended most of its operations earlier this month due to the shutdown, companies can’t get products approved right now. 

>> Read more trending news 

If the shutdown isn’t ended soon, the new devices that would have been advertised during the big game will not be hitting the market. 

The FCC cannot approve new smartphones, tablets and routers, legal news website Law360 and CNBC reported.

This could affect companies who plan to introduce new tech in the first quarter of the year, according to CNBC.

Last year, companies like Verizon, T-Mobile, Netflix and Sprint paid millions of dollars for advertising time during the football championship game, CNBC reported.

As the shutdown affects filings for new technology, the work stoppage may also affect travel plans for those trying to get to Atlanta if the shutdown stretches into February. 

Crowds are expected to swell to 100,000 to 115,000 people passing through TSA checkpoints the day after the game at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The TSA officials said there will be an additional 120 officers and 12 extra K-9 teams working at the airport.

Atlanta’s mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms called the combination of the shutdown and the Super Bowl “uncharted territory,” The Associated Press reported.

Bottoms said that the city is “preparing as best we can from our vantage point.”

She continues to encourage travelers to give themselves extra time to get through security and deal with long lines as TSA agents call off sick. They have been calling off almost double the rate compared to non-shutdown periods, the AP reported.

>>From our Washington Insider, Jamie Dupree: TSA: “Financial limitations” causing airport screeners not to show up for work

The TSA had 7 percent of its workforce off sick Monday compared to 2.5 percent this time last year, according to the AP.

>>Read: Atlanta airport security lines more than an hour long amid federal shutdown

Monday was the first day after workers did not receive a paycheck since the shutdown happened. Some security lines were closed due to lack of staffing and travelers waited more than an hour to get through security, the AJC reported. Some travelers missed flights due to the long line, the newspaper reported.

“Certainly there are factors that we don’t control such as what’s happening with our federal government shutdown and with the long TSA lines,” Bottoms said. “We are continuing to encourage people to get to the airport very early.”

CNN reported Wednesday that there was such a backlog for travelers at security checkpoints that TSA officers from other locations had to be flown to Atlanta to fill staffing positions.

'To Catch a Predator' host Chris Hansen arrested for bouncing checks

Chris Hansen, best known as the host of the Dateline NBC segment “To Catch a Predator,” has been arrested after he allegedly bounced checks to a vendor for marketing and promotional items and failed to pay for them.

The Stamford Advocate reported that the 59-year-old resident of Shippan, Connecticut, was arrested Monday. He was released without bond once he signed a written promise to appear in court.

>> Read more trending news 

According to an arrest affidavit obtained by the publication, Hansen asked Peter Psichopaida, the owner of Promotional Sales Limited, for 288 T-shirts, 355 mugs and 650 vinyl decals for him to use at events.

Psichopaidas told police that Hansen agreed to pay $12,998.05, the total cost for the items, before they were delivered to him in September 2017.

According to police, invoices were sent to Hansen for three months. When a person on Hansen’s staff sent a check for the full amount, it bounced. 

Psichopaidas spoke to Hansen about it, and the TV journalist apologized and tried to make a partial payment. By April 2018, Psichopaidas filed a complaint with police as the payment was still not made.

Later that month, Hansen wrote a personal check for $13,200. It bounced three days later and Hansen emailed Psichopaidas.

“Peter ... I truly thought I had this covered,” Hansen wrote, the affidavit said. “I am scrambling to get it done. Please give me till the end of the day. I sold a boat to cover the rest of this and need to pick up the payment this afternoon.”

A warrant for Hansen’s arrest was sent because he never sent a payment.

Hansen has not publicly commented on his arrest. He tweeted Wednesday that he was contemplating a morning run, indicating he was in Los Angeles.

More on Hansen’s arrest can be read at Stamford Advocate.

Ohio firefighters rescue puppy from icy pond

Franklin firefighters rescued a puppy from an icy pond in Franklin Township, Ohio Wednesday morning.

>> Read more trending news 

Fire Chief Jonathan Westendorf said firefighters were dispatched after 10 a.m. to rescue the puppy named Maggie, which had wandered onto a frozen pond in the 3200 block of Beal Road attempting to retrieve a duck decoy and fell through the ice, WHIO-TV reported. Westendorf said the puppy belongs to a nearby neighbor.

Firefighter/Emergency Medical Technician Kyle Keeler and Firefighter/Medic Blake Olsen successfully rescued the very cold and wet puppy from the pond. They were assisted by JEMS medics.

Westendorf said the firefighters pulled the decoy out of the pond to prevent something like this from happening again.

Veteran meets girls who returned lost wallet to his doorstep

A disabled Marine Corps veteran in Detroit met the twin sisters who returned a wallet he lost to his doorstep last week, WJBK reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Marc Walsh lost his wallet in the snow, and it was found by 14-year-old sisters Makhia Vincent and Makyla Vincent as they walked to school, the television station reported. The girls brought it to Walsh’s home but he was away. However, a security camera at the residence caught the girls’ good deed.

“I'm so incredibly grateful, so grateful and humbled,” Walsh told WJBK

Walsh’s wallet contained several hundred dollars in cash, credit cards and a military identification, the television station reported.

“Really heartbroken, I really didn't know what to do,” Walsh told WJBK.

The television station arranged a meeting Saturday between Walsh and the twins.

For the Vincent girls, thoughts of their grandfather weighed heavily in their decision to return the wallet.

“I read the veterans card and I was like, ‘I would hate if that was my granddad and that happened to him,’ so I knew we had to return it,” Makyla told WJBK.

The girls stood in front of the security camera and waved the wallet before dropping it on the doorstep. 

Reaction to the girls’ honesty was positive and swift.

“All of a sudden we were all over the news and people are saying, ‘Thank you for turning it in’ and everything, it was great,” Makhia told the television station. 

Walsh thanked the sisters and gave them all the cash that had been in his wallet when he lost it, WJBK reported.

“I feel really happy and grateful that I could help somebody because I know other people could have kept the money,” Makyla told the television station.

State of the Union address: Can Nancy Pelosi rescind Donald Trump’s invitation?

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday asked President Donald Trump to delay the State of the Union address because of the ongoing partial government shutdown.

>> Read more trending news

Pelosi, in a letter to Trump, said "Sadly, given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened for this address or for you to consider delivering your State of the Union address in writing to the Congress on January 29.”

>> Government shutdown: Pelosi asks Trump to postpone State of the Union address 

While Pelosi’s letter was a suggestion to delay the speech or for Trump to submit it in writing, she stopped short of disinviting the president to give the speech in the well of the House chamber, as has been the tradition.

>> State of the Union 2019: What day, what time, who will be there?

Can Pelosi disinvite Trump? Here is how the process of inviting a president happens:

The invitation to address a joint session of Congress is technically a House resolution that sets aside a day and time for the president to come to the Capitol and address a joint session of Congress.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Coast Guard misses paychecks as partial shutdown reaches Day 25

A joint session of Congress means both the members of the House of Representatives and the members of the Senate are together in one chamber to hear a speaker.

Because the speech involves a joint session, both the House and the Senate must pass resolutions to OK the joint session.

The passing of the resolutions, in essence, constitutes an invitation from both the speaker of the House and the Senate majority leader for the president to appear before both chambers of Congress.

So far, neither the House nor the Senate has passed such a resolution that invites the president to give the State of the Union address on Jan. 29.

Can Pelosi keep Trump from delivering the address?

Yes, she can in that she controls when a vote comes to the House floor. Pelosi could hold back the vote on the resolution to create a day and time for the president to speak, and prevent him from addressing House members.

Doesn’t the president have to give the speech?

There is no Constitutional requirement that a president delivers a State of the Union address in public. Article II, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution requires only that the president periodically "give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.”

Until 1913, presidents submitted reports to Congress. In 1913, Woodrow Wilson broke with that tradition and began giving a public address. Since then, the address has been a yearly occurrence, usually in January, that is given before a joint session of Congress and is televised.

Pelosi suggested in her letter that Trump submit the address in writing to the House.

 

Detectives: 3 dead in murder-suicide in Washington state

Three people are dead in Washington state in what investigators are calling a murder-suicide.

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Update 1:30 p.m. EST Jan. 16: The bodies of a couple and their adult son were found Tuesday during a welfare check at the couple’s home in Sammamish. Police said the deaths were the result of a murder-suicide, but they stopped short of saying who was responsible.

>> See the latest on KIRO7.com

Authorities said the victims died of gunshot wounds and that a weapon was recovered inside the house.

Neighbors told KIRO-TV that the couple’s adult son lived in the home with them and that he worked at Microsfot.

Friends and neighbors identified the female victim as Lorraine Ficken, 68. She was a realtor for Coldwell Banker Bain who was well-liked by n

“She was the sweetest woman in the world. Just so sweet,” neighbor Jennifer Eiken said. “She would do anything for you. Anytime I would go outside we would have a conversation, you know, for a long time. Just a really nice, nice person.”

Lorraine Ficken’s husband, 72-year-old Robert E. Ficken, was the acclaimed author of several books on the history of Washington State.

Their son, 34-year-old Matt Ficken, was a longtime software engineer.

“(He) was very kind of reclusive,” Eiken said. “I knew he had a great job working for Microsoft. He worked from home.”

Relatives in Oregon called Sammamish police after the family's phones went unanswered for several days.

The King County Sheriff’s Office said there were no recent calls to police from the home before Tuesday.

“We checked the records,” Sgt. Ryan Abbott said. “(Deputies) haven’t been here any time, at least recently, that we found, and aid hadn’t been here, either.”

Original report: According to Seattle's KIRO-TV, two men and a woman were found dead from gunshot wounds in a Sammamish home during a welfare check Tuesday. The King County Sheriff's Office described the woman and one of the men as "elderly," while the other man appeared to be in his 30s.

Authorities do not believe there are any suspects outstanding. 

The house is located in the 23900 block of SE 42nd Place.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Portland police look for driver who rammed 3 pedestrians

Police in Portland are investigating an apparent hit-and-run crash caught on video last Thursday in which a pickup truck appears to drive toward and plow into three people.

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The video was posted Friday by resident Javier Gonzalez, whose surveillance camera captured the incident. In the video, a gray pickup truck appears to drive toward three people who are running away from it. The truck appears to accelerate, jump a curb and drive straight into the pedestrians. The truck then drives away.

Police haven’t released the identities of the three people in the video or their conditions, The Oregonian reported. No one has tried to contact police about the incident, said Sgt. Brad Yakots, of the Portland police.

Police are trying to identify the driver of the truck, and are asking residents to be on the lookout for a gray pickup truck with a canopy, Yakots said.

Gonzalez told KPTV-TV he returned home Thursday to find things in his front yard out of place. Curious as to what happened, he reviewed the surveillance video, and was shocked by what he saw.

“It looked like, you know, he might’ve had a vendetta or something, and it’s not worth it,” Gonzalez said. “Even if someone does something to you, it’s never worth it to go after them. I say you should come forward, even if you did something wrong … hopefully, this can get sorted out.”

Women accused of putting heroin in recovery house manager's macaroni and cheese 

Two Michigan women are accused of poisoning a recovery house manager’s macaroni-and-cheese dinner by putting heroin in it, WDIV reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Port Huron police arrested Shanna Marie Kota, 40, and Sarah Elaine Prange, 22, on Sunday, WXYZ reported.

According to a statement from investigators obtained by The Detroit News, the 38-year-old worker at the Port Huron facility told police she heard rumors "that she was poisoned by two clients that didn't want her to work there anymore.”

According to police, the two Port Huron women placed what they believed was heroin in the house manager’s dinner on Friday, WXYZ reported.

The victim, who resides in the recovery home along with the suspects, discarded her meal after she said the food tasted funny, the television station reported.

When police arrived, the victim was taken to a hospital and doctors determined she was poisoned, the News reported. 

Both suspects were arraigned Tuesday on one count of poisoning, and bond was set at $100,000 each, WDIV reported.

A hearing is set for Jan. 29, the television station reported.

Who is Kirsten Gillibrand? Senator joins 2020 presidential race

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand announced Tuesday that she plans to run for president in the 2020 race for the White House.

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The New York Democrat said in an appearance Tuesday on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” that she was filing the paperwork necessary to launch an exploratory committee, which would enable her to raise money for a White House run.

“I'm going to run as president of the United States because, as a young mom, I'm going to fight for other people's kids as hard as I would fight for my own,” she said Tuesday.

Here are some things to know about Gillibrand:

  • Gillibrand was born Dec. 9, 1966, in Albany, New York.
  • She attended the Academy of Holy Names, an all-girls Catholic school in Albany, before graduating in 1984 from the Emma Willard School in Troy, New York. She graduated from Dartmouth College magna cum laude in 1988 and earned her law degree from the UCLA School of Law in 1991.
  • She worked as an attorney for more than a decade before being elected to represented New York in the U.S. House of Representatives. She represented the state's 20th congressional district in the House until 2009.
  • After President Barack Obama was elected to office in 2008, he chose former first lady Hillary Clinton, who at the time represent New York in the U.S. Senate, to serve as his secretary of state. Gillibrand was chosen to replace Clinton, The New York Times reported. She went on to win the seat when voters went to the polls in 2010.
  • Gillibrand has butted heads with President Donald Trump before over allegations of sexual assault, which Trump has denied. In December 2017, Trump took to social media to call Gillibrand "a total flunky" who "would do anything" for campaign contributions. Gillibrand criticized the president's response, calling it "a sexist smear."
  • Gillibrand lives in Brunswick, New York, with her husband of 18 years, Jonathan Gillibrand, and their sons, Theodore, 15 and Henry, 10.
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