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Jim Carrey surprises Jeff Daniels on ‘Conan’

Actor Jeff Daniels was on “Conan” Tuesday night promoting his Hulu drama series “The Looming Tower” and had his interview crashed by his friend and “Dumb and Dumber” co-star Jim Carrey.

>> Read more trending news 

Uproxx reported that Carrey was in the area and is gearing up to work with late-night host Conan O’Brien on his Showtime series “Kidding.”

CNN reported that O’Brien chatted with the two about working together on the 1994 comedy movie and it’s less-successful sequel. Carrey revealed that the duo’s performance as Lloyd and Harry drew praise from Dustin Hoffman.

“Dustin Hoffman called me and he said, ‘That is the most real relationship -- buddy relationship -- I’ve seen in movies in decades,’” Carrey said.

Watch Carrey surprise Daniels on “Conan” below. The interview contains a brief sexual innuendo and a censored expletive. 

Party w/The Bone This Cinco!

Child of Utah family with TV show dies after house fire

Police say a 2-year-old boy whose polygamous family is featured on a reality TV show has died following a fire in a southeastern Utah home.

The Deseret News reports Adonija Foster died of smoke inhalation Saturday after a fire ignited in the room where he was sleeping.

Members of the toddler's family star in TLC's "Three Wives, One Husband," which shows the lives of members of a community belonging to the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

The San Juan County Sheriff's Office says family members tried to revive the child before emergency personnel arrived at the house.

The boy was pronounced dead at the scene.

Authorities say two others in the house were treated for smoke inhalation and released the same day.

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Information from: Deseret News, http://www.deseretnews.com

Study shows TV employment exceeding newspapers

For what is believed to be the first time, the number of journalists working in local television newsrooms exceeds that of people in newspaper offices.

The Radio Television Digital News Association estimates the local TV news employment at 27,100 journalists this year, down 500 from 2017. While the American Society of News Editors has stopped keeping count of newspaper employment, consultant Ken Doctor estimates it at 25,000 or slightly below.

It was only back in 2000 that the newspaper employment more than doubled that of TV news operations. The news editors estimated some 56,200 reporters and editors worked at newspapers that year. TV had 24,100 people working.

The RTDNA said in a report Thursday that people who can do multimedia jobs are in demand at the TV stations.

No criminal charges filed in Prince's 2016 overdose death, prosecutor says

Authorities have declined to press criminal charges against anyone in the 2016 overdose death of musical icon Prince, saying Thursday that investigators were unable to determine where the artist got the fentanyl that killed him.

>> Read more trending news

>> READ MORE: Charges could be announced in Prince opioid investigation two years after his death | Prince died of fentanyl overdose, autopsy report released | Search warrants unsealed in Prince death investigation | Photos: Prince through the years | MORE

Destiny’s Child singer Michelle Williams engaged to pastor Chad Johnson

Former Destiny’s Child singer Michelle Williams is getting married.

The 37-year-old singer is engaged to pastor Chad Johnson, 40, after a year of dating.

Williams and Johnson opened up to People about their love story, which began in March 2017 at a spiritual retreat hosted by Elevate International.

>> Read more trending news 

Johnson, founder of Elevate International, led the retreat in Arizona and said he and Williams were in “very similar places on a personal level.”

“I was in a horrible, dark place,” Williams said. “I just needed to go somewhere where I could get a message of hope and restoration, rejuvenation — get connected to God.”

“Michelle was coming off the heels of a really bad relationship, and I was just in a place of despair as well,” Johnson, a professional sports chaplain who has worked with the Pittsburgh Steelers and L.A. Dodgers, said.

The two kept in touch after the retreat and progressed from texts to FaceTime calls.

“We spent almost three months without even seeing each other, just building a strong foundation on the phone and through FaceTime,” Johnson told People. “It was really built on friendship and communication.”

The two went on their first date at a wedding in the Dominican Republic, had their first kiss and decided to date officially.

“I told her, ‘I’ve been looking. I don’t want to look anymore. I’m done. My search is over,’” Johnson said.

A year to the day Johnson first reached out to Williams -- on March 21 -- the two got engaged. Johnson proposed with a 5-carat ring and a video of himself with members of Williams’ family.

“I started weeping and wailing when I see all these special people,” Williams said. “Towards the end of the video, something in my head said, ‘Pull yourself together! He’s about to propose! Stop all this crying!’”

Williams said she was drawn to her now-fiance because she could be herself with him, adding that Johnson calls her by her first name.

“My first name is Tenitra; my middle name is Michelle. I felt like I could be Tenitra; just ratchet, I didn’t have to have on any makeup, if I had to have on my hair bonnet — he just made me feel very safe in being myself,” she said.

The two plan on having a wedding this summer.

“It’s gonna be … think James Bond-meets-’Midsummer Night’s Dream’ — with a little hood in it,” Williams said. “It’s gonna be very traditional. We’re doing black-tie. We want it to be small and intimate and very private.”

Find out more about Johnson’s proposal and the couple’s love story at People.com.

Previously persona non grata, Cannes welcomes back Von Trier

Seven years after being banned by the Cannes Film Festival for jokingly calling himself a Nazi, Danish director Lars von Trier has been invited back to the French festival.

Von Trier was declared "persona non grata" by Cannes after expressing sympathy for Adolf Hitler in a 2011 press conference for his film "Melancholia." But Cannes on Thursday announced that von Trier's "The House That Jack Built" will play out of competition at next month's festival. The film stars Matt Dillon as a serial killer.

Von Trier has regularly been a figure of controversy in Cannes and elsewhere. In October, Icelandic singer Bjork said he sexually harassed her during the making of 2000's "Dancer in the Dark," which won Cannes' Palme d'Or. Von Trier has denied the allegations.

Thierry Fremaux has recently signaled that the festival might reinstitute von Trier. The Danish director apologized shortly after his comments in 2011, calling them "completely stupid." In response to a question about his heritage, von Trier said that he learned that he had German roots as well as Jewish. Von Trier said he "understands Hitler" and "I am a Nazi."

Cannes also said that Terry Gilliam's famously delayed, famously misfortunate "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" will close the festival. The film, which stars Adam Driver and Stellan Skarsgard, has taken Gilliam two decades to make because of endless production problems, funding issues and legal woes.

The festival also announced several more additions to its prestigious competition lineup: "The Wild Pear," from Turkish director and previous Palme winner Nuri Bilge Ceylan; "Knife + Heart," by French filmmaker Yann Gonzalez; and "The Little One," by Kazakh filmmaker Sergei Dvortsevoy.

That brings the competition slate to 21 titles, three of which are directed by women. Cannes has in recent years been criticized for not selecting more films by female filmmakers.

The 71st annual Cannes Film Festival runs May 8-20.

Prince remembered: Listen to audio from the singer’s final concert

For Prince fans who attended the singer’s last public concerts at the Fox Theatre last year, their memories of the show serve as a snapshot of one of the pop icon’s final public moments.

>> Read more trending news 

The singer, 57, died of a fentanyl overdose April 21, 2016, just one week after the two Atlanta concerts.

Related: Prince’s last concert was in Atlanta: Read a review

Even fans who weren’t able to attend the Piano and a Microphone shows can get a glimpse into what the acoustic sets were like.

Related: Toxicology report says Prince had ‘exceedingly high’ amount of fentanyl in his body when he died

Audio of the singer’s final public concert remains online via a recording that has been uploaded to Soundcloud.

We’ve also put together a playlist of the set list from the last show on Apple Music and Spotify. The playlists only feature the songs that the singer’s estate has allowed on streaming services and they’re not the acoustic versions that were performed during the concert.

Nat Geo says 'Frankenstein' author is its next 'Genius'

"Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley is the National Geographic TV network's third genius.

The network announced Thursday that the 19th-century writer will be the next subject of what is becoming a franchise, a miniseries on a particular historical figure. The first series, featuring Albert Einstein, premiered last year. The second, profiling artist Pablo Picasso, starts Tuesday.

Shelley was a prolific writer in the early 1800s, with "Frankenstein" in particular still alive as a piece of literature. The Shelley series will air in 2019, most likely in the spring. The same creative team of Brian Grazer and Ron Howard's Imagine Entertainment will make it.

Shelley died of a brain tumor in 1851 at age 53.

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Online:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/

The Latest: Prince fan says superstar didn't get justice

The Latest on the investigation into Prince's death (all times local):

2:20 p.m.

At least one Prince fan says she doesn't believe he got justice when a Minnesota prosecutor announced that no criminal charges would be filed in the musician's accidental overdose death two years ago.

Thirty-nine-year-old Kimberlee Andrus of Austin, Minnesota, attended the news conference Thursday where Carver County Attorney Mark Metz made the announcement. The prosecutor said investigators were unable to determine who supplied the counterfeit opioid drugs that killed Prince.

Andrus says the announcement was "devastating." She says Prince deserves for the truth to come out, and she doesn't think it will.

Andrus wore a purple sweater and has a tattoo of Prince's love symbol. She plans to participate in a candlelight vigil Friday night outside Paisley Park, which is Prince's former estate. Saturday will mark the second anniversary of his death.

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1 p.m.

A friend of Prince's who authorities said helped the pop superstar obtain pain medication says he's relieved not to be charged in Prince's death.

That's according to F. Clayton Tyler, an attorney for the Prince friend, Kirk Johnson. Tyler says Thursday's announcement by a state prosecutor that no criminal charges would be filed in Prince's death affirms Johnson's innocence.

Tyler says Johnson continues to deny that he had anything to do with Prince's death.

A search warrant in the case said Johnson asked a doctor to prescribe pain medication for Prince, and the doctor prescribed oxycodone in Johnson's name. Federal authorities said earlier Thursday that the doctor had agreed to pay a civil penalty to resolve the case.

Prince died of a fentanyl overdose, not oxycodone.

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12:30 p.m.

As the state of Minnesota ends its investigation into Prince's death without criminal charges, federal authorities say they haven't gotten any credible evidence to support charges either.

Carver County Attorney Mark Metz announced Thursday that investigators had found no evidence to charge anyone in the case. He says Prince thought he was taking Vicodin pills, not the fentanyl that killed him, and there was no evidence anyone around Prince knew the pills were counterfeit.

After Metz's announcement, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Minneapolis issued a statement saying it hasn't received any credible evidence that would support federal criminal charges. The office said it wouldn't comment further.

A law enforcement official close to the investigation told The Associated Press that the federal investigation is now inactive unless new information comes forward. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the case remains open.

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Associated Press writer Amy Forliti contributed to this report.

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12 p.m.

A Minnesota prosecutor says Prince thought he was taking Vicodin when he accidentally overdosed on fentanyl.

Carver County Attorney Mark Metz detailed a two-year investigation that he said found no evidence to warrant criminal charges being filed in the pop superstar's death.

Prince died April 21, 2016, at his Paisley Park compound.

Metz says evidence showed that Prince took counterfeit Vicodin without knowing it. And Metz says there's no evidence any of the people surrounding Prince gave him counterfeit Vicodin or knew he had it.

A doctor who was accused of illegally prescribing a pain medication to Prince shortly before he died agreed Thursday to pay a fine as part of a civil settlement. But that pain medication wasn't what killed Prince.

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11:35 p.m.

The prosecutor in the Minnesota county where Prince died says he's filing no criminal charges in the musician's death.

The announcement Thursday from Carver County Attorney Mark Metz means the state's investigation into how Prince got the fentanyl that killed him is closed. It came hours after documents revealed a doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid for Prince had agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation.

Metz said the evidence shows Prince thought he was taking Vicodin, not fentanyl. He said there's no evidence any person associated with Prince knew he possessed any counterfeit pill containing fentanyl.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016.

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11:25 a.m.

A newly unsealed federal search warrant says a Minnesota doctor who treated Prince in the weeks before he died expressed concern that the musician was suffering from opiate withdrawal.

The document unsealed Thursday says Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg saw Prince on April 7, 2016, at the request of Prince's friend, Kirk Johnson, and prescribed Vitamin D and ondansetron under Johnson's name.

The document says Johnson called the doctor on April 14 and asked him to prescribe a pain medication for Prince. Authorities say Schulenberg prescribed oxycodone for Prince, again under Johnson's name. Schulenberg disputes that, but is paying $30,000 to settle a civil violation.

The doctor also saw Prince on April 20 when Prince was reporting feeling antsy. A urinalysis tested positive for opioids.

Prince was found dead of a fentanyl overdose the next day. The doctor is not facing criminal charges and his attorney says he had no role in Prince's death.

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10:25 a.m.

An attorney for a Minnesota doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid painkiller for Prince a week before the musician died from a fentanyl overdose denies the allegation but says he agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation to avoid the expense and risk of litigation.

Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg was accused of prescribing oxycodone to Prince and putting it under the name of Prince's bodyguard and close friend, Kirk Johnson, to protect Prince's privacy.

But attorney Amy Conners says in a statement that Schulenberg affirms his previous statement that he did not prescribe opiates to any patient with the intention that they be given to Prince.

She says that after the doctor learned of Prince's addiction, he immediately began working to get him into treatment

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10 a.m.

A Minnesota doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid for Prince a week before the musician died has agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil claim.

The settlement comes as state prosecutors are planning to announce whether anyone will be charged in the two-year investigation into Prince's death.

Prince died on April 21, 2016, from an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid. No one has been criminally charged.

But the federal government alleges that Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg violated the Controlled Substances Act when he wrote a prescription in someone else's name on April 14, 2016.

The settlement released Thursday doesn't name Prince, but search warrants previously released say Schulenberg wrote a prescription for oxycodone in the name of Prince's bodyguard, intending it to go to Prince.

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12 a.m.

A two-year probe into the overdose death of music superstar Prince is reaching a critical stage as a county prosecutor reveals whether criminal charges will be filed.

Carver County Attorney Mark Metz planned a news conference Thursday morning to give an update on the investigation. It is scheduled for 11:30 a.m.

Prince died April 21, 2016, after being found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his home and recording studio in a Minneapolis suburb. An autopsy showed he died of an accidental fentanyl overdose.

Prince's death at 57 sparked a national outpouring of grief, as well as a joint county and federal investigation.

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