On Air Now
No Program

business

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Audi recalls 1.2 million vehicles due to faulty coolant pumps

More than a million Audi vehicles are being recalled by Volkswagen Group of America because of faulty coolant pumps. Audi is a luxury brand of Volkswagen.

>> Read more trending news 

The Associated Press reported Tuesday that the company issued the recall on 1.2 million cars and SUVs with a 2-liter turbocharged engine. The recall includes the 2013-2016 A4, 2013-2017 A5, 2012-2015 A6 and the 2013-2017 Q5.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the electric coolant pump in the vehicle can be blocked with debris and lead to a short-circuit or overheating.

Dealerships will replace the pumps at no cost to car owners. Recall letters will be sent out on or before June 11. Another notice will be mailed when the redesigned parts are available, which should be in November. In the meantime, a spokesman told The AP, dealers will install a new version of the current pump.

Delta passenger with multiple sclerosis says airline employees tied her to wheelchair

A woman with multiple sclerosis says Delta Air Lines employees tied her to her wheelchair because she can’t sit up on her own and they didn’t have the chair she needed.

>> Watch the news report here

Maria Saliagas travels to Europe with her husband every year. When she was diagnosed with MS five years ago, she didn’t want to break her tradition of traveling with her husband.

>> Southwest Airlines cancels dozens of flights amid inspections after deadly engine failure

She said Delta normally accommodates her by making sure staff members have a proper wheelchair that has straps to help her sit up straight.

When she flew out of Atlanta on April 1 and arrived in Amsterdam, Delta didn’t have a chair with straps, so employees tied her to a regular wheelchair with someone else’s blanket, said her son, Nathan Saliagas.

>> Memorial service held for woman killed during Southwest Airlines flight

“They took a dirty blanket and tied her forcefully with it, and she has bruise marks on part of her arm because it was so tight and she started crying. That’s when that picture was taken,” Saliagas said.

A Delta representative sent WSB-TV a statement about the incident, saying: 

“We regret the perception our service has left on these customers. We have reached out to them, not only to resolve their concerns, but also ensure that their return flight exceeds expectations.”

>> Read more trending news 

The family returns to Atlanta on April 30.

When the family complained to Delta, they said the airline offered them 20,000 free SkyMiles, but they said that's not enough. 

They want to see a policy change regarding how Delta handles passengers with disabilities.

Amazon now offers in-car package delivery

Can’t wait until you get home to open that package you ordered? You’re in luck: Amazon announced Tuesday that it is now offering in-car package delivery.

 >> Read more trending news 

#YetiCoolerChallenge: NRA supporters are blowing up their Yeti products to protest company

Over the weekend, the National Rifle Association sent an email to its members saying Austin, Texas-based Yeti had “suddenly, without prior notice” indicated it no longer wished to do business with the NRA Foundation, according to reports

>> NRA: Yeti won't do business with us

“That certainly isn’t sportsmanlike,” the email read, in part. “In fact, Yeti should be ashamed. They have declined to continue helping America’s young people enjoy outdoor recreational activities. These activities enable them to appreciate America and enjoy our natural resources with wholesome and healthy outdoor recreational and educational programs.”

The statement prompted a lot of backlash from Yeti owners who support the NRA. 

Later Monday, Yeti released a statement saying that the NRA’s claims are “inaccurate” and that the company is “unwavering in our belief in and commitment to the Constitution of the United States and its Second Amendment.”

>> Read more trending news 

That didn’t stop people from destroying their Yeti products in protest, however.

Dubbed the #YetiCoolerChallenge, the earliest video we could find on YouTube was shared on April 22, and it features a Yeti tumbler being crushed in a vise.

Other videos included creative means of Yeti destruction like filling up a cooler with tannerite and shooting it with a rifle, or just shooting a tumbler with a revolver:

 

As expected, folks on Twitter had all sorts of opinions:

To give you an idea of what’s in one of those coolers, by the way, here’s a YouTube video from “What’s Inside?” where they cut a Yeti cooler in half:

Southwest Airlines cancels dozens of flights amid inspections after deadly engine failure

Southwest Airlines said it canceled about 40 flights Sunday as it inspects engine fan blades in the wake of an engine failure last week that led to one passenger’s death.

>> Memorial service held for woman killed during Southwest Airlines flight

That’s about 1 percent of Dallas-based Southwest’s daily schedule of nearly 4,000 flights. The airline encouraged passengers to check their flight status. “We anticipate minimal delays or cancellations each day due to the inspections,” Southwest said in a written statement.

Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines has the same type of engines on the Boeing 737s in its fleet and is also adding ultrasonic inspections of the engines, but said it doesn’t expect any operational impact to customers.

>> Who was Jennifer Riordan, the passenger killed on a Southwest Airlines flight?

Both airlines last week, in advance of the Federal Aviation Administration’s official release of an emergency airworthiness directive, said they would accelerate the inspections.

The FAA on Friday issued the anticipated directive requiring airlines to inspect fan blades on certain engines within 20 days. The directive draws from information gathered in the investigation of Southwest’s engine failure last Tuesday. The FAA said the inspection requirement is estimated to affect 352 engines in the United States and 681 engines worldwide.

>> Passenger killed in Southwest Airlines emergency landing identified

The CFM56-7B engine that blew on the Southwest flight showed evidence of “metal fatigue,” according to the National Transportation Safety Board. That engine model is on all of Southwest’s 737-700s and 737-800s, which make up the vast majority of Southwest’s fleet.

>> Read more trending news 

Delta has a fleet of about 185 Boeing 737s with the engines, out of a fleet of more than 800 planes of various types.

Amazon working on home robot, report says

Amazon.com Inc. may be gearing up for its next big project: a home robot.

>> On AJC.com: Amazon in 2018: 6 things you should know about the e-commerce giant

The rumor comes from a Bloomberg report published Monday in which sources familiar with the plan revealed that the company has started work on the domestic robot under the code name Vesta.

>> Read more trending news 

According to the sources, Vesta has apparently been in the works for years, but new job listings for Lab126, Amazon’s hardware research and development division, have sprung up this year.

Lab126 engineers previously built Amazon’s Kindle, Fire Phone and Echo.

“People briefed on the plan say the company hopes to begin seeding the robots in employees’ homes by the end of this year, and potentially with consumers as early as 2019,” Bloomberg reported, noting that the timeline may change.

>> On AJC.com: 6 most impressive benefits offered to Amazon employees

The Vesta robot prototypes reportedly have computer vision software and advanced cameras for navigation. Think of a “mobile Alexa, accompanying customers in parts of their home where they don’t have Echo devices,” Bloomberg analysts wrote.

An Amazon spokesperson told Bloomberg the company doesn’t comment on “rumors and speculation.” The AJC has reached out to Amazon for comment, as well. 

>> On AJC.com: Amazon tours Atlanta in its second headquarters search

Other companies have dabbled in domestic robots before, including iRobot and its Roomba vacuum and MobileRobots Inc.’s Jeeves home security robot.

Read the full report from Bloomberg.com.

Dream internship: Harley-Davidson seeks college students to ride across America

Harley-Davidson is seeking a select group of college students who are eager for an internship on two wheels.

>> Read more trending news 

The motorcycle company's #FindYourFreedom internship is going viral, and for good reason. The 12-week paid internship involves riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle across the country this summer. The best perk of all? Interns who complete the program get to keep the motorcycle.

Full requirements for the internship can be found on Harley-Davidson's website. In addition to riding across the country, interns will be expected to attend company events along the way, post scenes from the journey on social media and serve as  brand ambassadors, recruiting others into the sport of motorcycling.

Applicants who don't know how to ride a motorcycle will be required to take a course offered by Harley-Davidson Riding Academy.

The internship is open to college juniors and seniors who are at least 18 years old and are interested in marketing and public relations. Creative applications are encouraged.

Toys R Us rejects Bratz CEO’s buyout offer for being too low, report says

Toys R Us has rejected MGA Entertainment CEO Isaac Larian’s $675 million bid for about 30 percent of the remaining U.S. and Canada locations of the business.

CNN Money reported that the bid, which was made April 13, was too low, according to sources.

>> Read more trending news 

Toys R Us filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2017 and announced store closings March 15.

“If this is true, it is very disappointing,” Larian said of the report. “We feel confident that we submitted a fair valuation of the company’s U.S. assets.” Larian added that he wants to keep working to save the business.

Larian’s company, MGA Entertainment, is known for making Bratz dolls and Little Tikes toys. 

Related: CEO of MGA Entertainment makes formal offer to buy Toys R Us

“The liquidation of Toys R Us is going to have a long-term effect on the toy business. The industry will truly suffer,” the billionaire said in a statement last week announcing the bid. “The prospect of bringing the Toys R Us experience to a new generation, my new grandson's generation, is enough to motivate me to Save Toys R Us.”

At the time, Larian said he would use his own money and financing from banks and other investors for the bid.

Toys R Us is considering other offers, CNN Money reported

Amazon warehouse culture like 'prison,' undercover author writes 

An undercover author said working in an Amazon fulfillment center is like "a prison," where workers were urinating in bottles because they did not have enough time to go to the bathroom. 

>> Read more trending news

James Bloodworth, as part of his book "Hired: Six Months Undercover in Low-Wage Britain," spent almost a month in 2016 working as a "picker" at a fulfillment center in Rugeley, England, where he retrieved items for delivery.

In addition to his undercover work at Amazon, Bloodworth also took jobs in social care, at a call center, at a building site and even as an Uber driver to research how people cope at their workplace. 

According to Bloodworth, Amazon fulfillment workers had to meet high productivity targets that were feasible only if they ran around the warehouse. Running around the warehouse is something Amazon does not allow for safety reasons.

"The job itself is really bad," Bloodworth told Business Insider. "I've worked in warehouses before, but this was nothing like I had experienced. You don't have proper breaks — by the time you get to the canteen, you only have 15 or 20 minutes for lunch, in a 10½-hour working day. You don't have time to eat properly to get a drink.

"You have to go through security when you leave the warehouse, and that adds five minutes. It's like an airport — belt off, watch off. The atmosphere is what I imagine a prison feels like. You felt like you were walking on eggshells."

Bloodworth's claim that workers were so busy that they had to urinate in bottles sparked widespread outrage on social media on Monday.

Bloodworth told The Sun, a news company in the UK, that "workers often didn't take a break to go to the toilet because they were too sparse to get to quickly and they feared punishment for missing productivity targets. So they peed in bottles instead."

"If you're on the top floor, you know it will take five minutes to go the toilet, and all the time you're being admonished for taking too much idle time," Bloodworth said. 

Bloodworth explained how he came across a bottle of urine while searching for items on an upper floor of the warehouse.

"One day I'm walking down the aisle, and I go to pick up an item, and there's a bottle of straw-colored water on the shelf. And at first I thought, 'Oh, what's that?'" he said. "And then it was very obvious what it was. And there was a pool of water next to it. It struck me — it was so obvious why someone would do that."

According to Business Insider, Amazon said that it doesn't time warehouse workers' toilet breaks and that it ensures they can reach the bathrooms easily.

Amazon responded in a statement to Business Insider, saying that “We don't recognize these allegations as an accurate portrayal of activities in our buildings.”

The book can be found on Amazon’s website.

Starbucks closing over 8,000 stores for racial-bias training after controversial arrest

More than 8,000 Starbucks stores will be closed nationwide next month for a one-day training aimed at educating employees about racial bias.

The training was announced after two black men were arrested last week at a Philadelphia Starbucks, raising questions of racial bias and sparking criticism at the store and online.

>> Read more trending news

Company officials said more than 8,000 company-owned Starbucks locations will be closed on the afternoon of May 29 for racial-bias training. Nearly 175,000 employees across the country will receive the training, which will become a regular part of the company’s onboarding process, Starbucks officials said.

Two black men were arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia last week after an employee called 911 to say the men were trespassing.

>> Related: Starbucks CEO meets with 2 black men arrested in Philadelphia store

Employees told officers the men were denied the use of the coffee shop’s bathroom and refused to leave, police Commissioner Richard Ross said Saturday.

The men were not charged.

The incident gained national attention after video of the arrests appeared on social media.

>> Related: Video showing arrest of two black men at Starbucks sparks outrage

Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson apologized to the men in a private meeting with them Monday, a Starbucks spokesperson told CNN. The spokesperson declined to elaborate on what took place during the meeting.

Johnson apologized for the incident in a statement Saturday and pledged to investigate. He said Tuesday that the planned racial-bias training “is just one step in a journey that requires dedication from every level of our company and partnerships in our local community.”

>> Related: Starbucks manager leaves company after controversial arrest of 2 black men

“While this is not limited to Starbucks, we’re committed to being a part of the solution,” he said.

Several national and local experts will help to form the curriculum for the training, Starbucks officials said, including NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund President Sherrilyn Ifill, Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt and former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.

Company officials said experts will also monitor and review whether the training is effective.

There are more than 28,000 Starbucks stores in 77 countries.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >