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Olympic figure skater Paul Fentz wows with 'Game of Thrones' costume

“Game of Thrones” fans from around the world were loving German Olympic figure skater Paul Fentz’s costume at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

>> Visit WPXI.com for complete coverage of the 2018 Winter Olympics

Fentz was clearly not on the fence when it came to a tribute to the character Jaime Lannister, and neither were people on the internet when it came to voicing positive opinions about it.

>> Too racy for the Olympics? Figure skaters Tessa Virtue, Scott Moir tone down controversial lift

The Olympian also skated to the “Game of Thrones” soundtrack.

Here's what fans had to say:

>> Olympic figure skater Yura Min suffers wardrobe malfunction, handles it with class

Even commentators Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir were into it.

>> Read more trending news 

“It was not his best, but a Lannister always pays his debts,” Lipinski said. “This music gets me.”

What will Meghan wear? Royal wedding dress a top UK secret

Where does one shop for a wedding gown set to be the dress of the year — an outfit chic enough for a fashion-loving bride but suitable for a church so regal it's the burial place of monarchs?

Everyone at London Fashion Week — and elsewhere — is dying to know.

With only three months to go before Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's May 19 wedding at Windsor Castle, both the fashion and bridal worlds are abuzz with talk of who the bride will pick to design her dress and what kind of look she would go for.

It's no wonder: There's not been a bigger royal wedding since Harry's brother Prince William married Kate Middleton in 2011 in an extravaganza broadcast around the world. Seven years later, Kate's lacey, long-sleeved Alexander McQueen gown is still influencing bridal designs today.

"It's going to be the greatest fashion commission of 2018. There'll be millions of eyeballs on it," said Jade Beer, editor at the British edition of Brides magazine. "It's her major fashion moment."

"She'll definitely need an upgrade from the dress she wore for her first wedding," Beer added, referring to the simple strapless white gown the American actress wore at her 2011 Jamaica beach wedding to film producer Trevor Engelson. The couple divorced in 2013.

While the design — as well as the designer — of the dress is a closely guarded secret, many are positive that Markle will choose a British designer.

Kate wasn't the only bride in Britain's extended royal family sticking with a British designer. Zara Phillips, Queen Elizabeth II's second-eldest grandchild, wore royal couturier Stewart Parvin. In 1981, then-Lady Diana Spencer — the late mother of groom Harry — surprised many when she chose David and Elizabeth Emanuel, a pair of designers fresh out of college.

Front-runners for Markle's choice include British-Canadian Erdem Moralioglu, known for his elegant, feminine styles; Ralph & Russo, the couture designers Markle chose for her engagement dress; heritage fashion powerhouse Burberry; as well as McQueen and Giles Deacon, who designed the wedding gown for Kate's sister Pippa Middleton.

Victoria Beckham has denied rumors that she's been asked. French designer Roland Mouret has also been cited as a possible pick.

"I mean, she could surprise us all and choose a Canadian brand — she was so loyal to them while she was filming up there," said Miles Socha, editor-in-chief at Women's Wear Daily, referring to the time Markle spent in Toronto filming the TV series "Suits." ''But probably we would have to place our bets on a British designer."

Some are hoping Markle will pick something less traditional because she has more leeway. After all, Harry is only fifth in line to the throne — and will be sixth after Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, gives birth to her third child in April. In addition, their wedding venue, St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle, is less imposing than St. Paul's Cathedral or Westminster Abbey in London.

"I really expect something different from her. Her style is so clean, really modern, and bridal has been so traditional in the past few years," said London-based bridal designer Naomi Neoh. "I think — I hope — it would be clean, simple with beautiful detailing."

Neoh hopes Markle will choose a dress that celebrates her individuality.

"Meghan's very different from the English tradition. She's got her career, she's half-black," she said. "She's not going to be queen. It has to be respectful and appropriate of course, but it can be a bit more exciting with the cut and the lines. I think maybe a high neck, low back — that'd be demure enough."

Still, it's a dress that needs to live up to the grandeur of its surroundings. St. George's Chapel is intimate only by royal proportions. It seats 800 guests and has a very important place in British history as the resting place of scores of kings and queens — including both of the queen's parents.

"She's going to be walking over dead monarchs on the way up the aisle," said Beer. "There's a huge sense of occasion."

Markle has already signaled a break from the conservative styles that dominate British royal wardrobes, ditching stuffy frock coats for sleek trousers. Many admired the sharp trouser suit she wore to match Harry's outfit at a recent official event.

The actress herself has offered some clues about her dream wedding dress.

In March 2016, before she met Harry, she told Glamour magazine that she favored "classic and simple" styles with "a modern twist," and that she preferred "wedding dresses that are whimsical or subtly romantic." She named Ellie Saab and J. Mendel among her favorite designers, and said her favorite celebrity wedding dress was the simple slip of a gown that Carolyn Besette Kennedy wore in 1996.

Circumstances have changed since then — but whatever style she picks, Markle's choice will soon be seen in bridal salons everywhere.

Referring to Kate's gown, Neoh said: "Literally the next day, everyone wanted long lace sleeves — the year after getting lace was impossible. It was bananas."

Many say with Markle's looks and the young royals' popularity, she could get away with nearly anything.

"I think everybody here loves her so dearly," said designer Jasper Conran. "She can wear a dishcloth and people won't mind."

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Hilary Fox and Gregory Katz in London contributed to this story.

'Three Billboards' wins, women make waves at UK film awards

Ferocious female-led tragicomedy "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" was the big winner Sunday at the British Academy Film Awards in London, where women demanding an end to harassment, abuse and inequality dominated the ceremony.

Martin McDonagh's film about a bereaved mother seeking justice won five trophies including best film, outstanding British film and best actress, for Frances McDormand.

Producer Graham Broadbent said the movie is "the story of a woman taking on the establishment and status quo."

"It seems more timely now than we could ever have imagined," he said.

Writer-director McDonagh said it was fitting, in the year of the "Time's Up" campaign, that "Three Billboards" is "a film about a woman who refuses to take any s(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) anymore."

"Our film is a hopeful one in lots of ways, but it's also an angry one," McDonagh said. "As we've seen this year, sometimes anger is the only way to get people to listen and to change."

McDonagh won the original screenplay prize for "Three Billboards," which also netted Sam Rockwell the supporting actor trophy. Allison Janney was named best supporting actress for playing ice skater Tonya Harding's domineering mother in "I, Tonya."

Guillermo del Toro won the directing prize for monster fantasy "The Shape of Water," which also took trophies for music and production design.

Gary Oldman, the favorite among bookies, won the best actor prize for playing British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in "Darkest Hour."

The British prizes, known as BAFTAs, are considered a key indicator of likely success at Hollywood's Oscars in two weeks' time.

The film awards season in the United States and elsewhere has been overshadowed by the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse leveled at scores of entertainment figures since women began coming forward to accuse Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein last year.

England's Old Vic Theatre has been rocked by allegations against former artistic director Kevin Spacey. London police are also investigating nine claims of sexual assault by Weinstein.

The red carpet and the auditorium at London's Royal Albert Hall were a sea of black as actresses such as Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lawrence and Margot Robbie eschewed color as a statement against sexual misconduct and gender inequality.

Several actresses brought feminist activists as guests, and men showed solidarity with "Time's Up" lapel pins.

McDormand opted to wear black and red rather than all black, and noted: "I have a little trouble with compliance."

"But I want you to know that I stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black," she said.

On the red carpet, actress Andrea Riseborough, who brought U.K. Black Pride founder Phyll Opoku-Gyimah as her guest, said she also hoped the film industry was on the road to greater equality and diversity.

"It's more likely we'll see an alien onscreen than we'll see an Asian woman at the moment, which is disgraceful," Riseborough said.

Prince William — the British Academy's president — and the Duchess of Cambridge were guests of honor at Sunday's ceremony, hosted by "Absolutely Fabulous" star Joanna Lumley. Kate acknowledged the evening's muted fashion by wearing a dark green Jenny Packham dress with black belt.

The call to wear black put Kate in a delicate position, because the royal family is careful to avoid political statements.

Ahead of the ceremony, almost 200 British women in entertainment called for an international movement to end sexual misconduct.

Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, Naomie Harris, Emma Watson and Gemma Arterton were among signatories to a letter saying that 2018 should be "the year that time was up on sexual harassment and abuse."

The stars called for an end to impunity for abusers and announced a fund to support women and men battling workplace abuse, modeled on the "Time's Up" movement in the U.S.

Former "Harry Potter" star Watson has given the fund 1 million pounds ($1.4 million), according to its page on the Go Fund Me website.

The ceremony honored several generations of talent. Filmmaker James Ivory, 89, took the adapted screenplay prize for "Call Me By Your Name."

The 80-year-old director Ridley Scott, whose films include "Blade Runner," ''Alien," ''Thelma and Louise" and "Gladiator," received the academy's highest honor, the BAFTA Fellowship.

Daniel Kaluuya, the 28-year-old British star of "Get Out," won the rising star award and made a plea for public arts funding, which helped him get his start.

Kaluuya, who is also Oscar-nominated, joked that success meant taking Ubers rather than the subway.

"I get that Prius everywhere," he said.

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For full coverage of awards season: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason

Christopher Bailey's Burberry farewell tops London shows

Christopher Bailey's final show as Burberry creative director dominated London Fashion Week on Saturday. Bailey is leaving the popular brand later this year after a 17-year stint that helped it regain its prominence as a global fashion power.

Newcomer Simone Rocha and veteran Jasper Conran were among the designers showcasing their latest styles as fashion week kicked into high gear. Some highlights from the style extravaganza:

A BURBERRY FAREWELL BRINGS DOWN THE STAR-STUDDED HOUSE

Animal rights activists may have hassled the high-fashion crowd entering the Burberry show, but once the 1,300 guests were safely inside the event turned into a lovefest.

The affection was for Christopher Bailey, who is leaving Burberry later this year after serving as creative director and chief executive, among other jobs. Bailey's final show was a milestone for him and for the company he helped revive.

He dedicated his farewell show to organizations that support the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities.

"There has never been a more important time to say that in our diversity lies our strength and our creativity," Bailey said.

The spectacle was part fashion show, part performance art and part laser lighting display. It ended with Bailey walking down the fog-filled runway to a prolonged standing ovation from a crowd that included Kate Moss, Sienna Miller, Chelsea Clinton and many others famous fans.

"It was exquisite," said Miller, who seemed near tears moments after the show ended. "One of the most spectacular things I've ever seen. It was brave and it was political and it was beautiful."

Clinton also seemed overcome with emotion.

"It showed so much humanity, so much of what he is as a person," she said. "I'm just so glad I could be here and see it in person to celebrate Christopher as he goes on to the next chapter."

Model and actress Cara Delevingne made a now-rare catwalk appearance for Bailey and the Burberry brand. She closed the show wearing a regal, rainbow-themed outfit and leading the other models through the finale, which was set off by a spectacular laser show.

The audience was filled with luminaries, including actor Idris Elba and actresses Naomie Harris, Keira Knightley, and Naomi Watts. Former Oasis singer Liam Gallagher and Michael Jackson's daughter, Paris, also were in the crowd.

The show featured many references to the familiar Burberry check, which was worked into a number of jackets, caps and tops, along with some gorgeous gowns and stylish bomber jackets.

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PRETTIFIED TAILORING AT SIMONE ROCHA

Dainty lace, ruffles, pretty bows: Simone Rocha's latest collection may include every girly cliche, but there's more than meets the eye.

The young designer, known for her modern take on sweet, doll-like looks, dressed models in frilly gold or black tulle and lace dresses over slim tailored pieces such as a buttoned-up shirt or a trouser suit. The outfits were finished off with mannish brogue shoes or furry flat slippers.

There were exaggerated puff sleeves, embroidered roses, fur trims and rich floral brocade fabrics, perhaps a nod to the John Constable portraits Rocha referred to in her show notes. They were certainly a match with the show's venue, an ornate red and gold room adorned with giant candlelit chandeliers in London's palatial Goldsmiths' Hall.

Rocha did break away from delicate dresses, and those were some of the show's strongest looks: Belted, double-breasted patent leather coats that came in a striking red or military green, as well as red and navy plaid outfits adorned with a tinsel-like trim.

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ELEGANCE AND RICH COLORS AT JASPER CONRAN

Designer Jasper Conran pared down the in-your-face, bombastic style some rivals have adopted for London Fashion Week. Instead, Conran showed an elegant collection that relied on many monochromatic outfits with subtle shifts of texture and drape to set them off. The apparent simplicity, offset by the detailing and workmanship, made for an often captivating result.

"I think it's very much what I've learned in my career. These are the things that I know," said Conran, one of the founding designers of London Fashion Week. "So it's an expression of quite a long time of learning."

Conran described the basic elements he used as navy, white and sulphur yellow, with a wide variety of other unusual colors and textures weaved in. He found expressive ways to mix and match, but also relied on one color from head to toes walking the runway in matching, understated shoes. Most models wore their hair long and natural, giving the collection an airy, ethereal feel.

When shades were mixed, it was frequently striking — as in a surprisingly effective dress that paired olive green with dark brown.

Trousers and some dresses were often pleated, and lightweight parkas set off some outfits. Conran seemed to show a special flair in various shades of yellow, including a hooded yellow parka that seemed both practical and sexy.

Disney says 'Black Panther' is raking it in

"Black Panther" is so far raking it in over the holiday weekend.

The Walt Disney Co. estimated Saturday the Marvel Comics superhero movie earned $75.8 million domestically for its opening Friday, the eighth biggest day in industry history.

Disney now estimates the movie will earn between $190 million and $210 million for the four-day Presidents Day weekend that started Thursday.

Besides the strong box office, the movie has been a critical success.

The Ryan Coogler-directed film stars Chadwick Boseman as Black Panther. It also features Michael B. Jordan and Lupita Nyong'o.

Official box office estimates are out Sunday.

Drake touts giveaways, urges fans to do something nice, too

Drake wants to spread the love, and he's challenging his fans to do the same.

The new video for the rap star's single, "God's Plan," announces upfront that Drake gave away the $996,631 budget to film the clip.

He's been giving away money in Miami lately, including a $50,000 scholarship to a University of Miami student. The video shows him surprising other Miami residents with wads of cash and going into a supermarket and announcing to customers that everything they want to buy is on him.

Drake said on Instagram Saturday that he wanted fans to do something to bring joy to someone and to tag him with the details.

He said he wants people to be nice to each other, even if only for 24 hours.

UK party sacks leader in fallout from racist Markle texts

The troubled U.K. Independence Party ousted its leader Saturday after a scandal over racist text messages sent by his girlfriend, leaving the future of the right-wing party that played a key role in Brexit once more uncertain.

A majority of party members backed a motion of no confidence in UKIP Leader Henry Bolton, who had faced growing pressure to resign since a newspaper in mid-January published the messages Jo Marney wrote about Meghan Markle, Prince Harry's fiancee.

Marney, 25, who was also a UKIP member, was suspended from the party at the time.

The departure of Bolton, who was only elected to his role in September, will trigger the fourth leadership contest in the party since 2016.

Marney, who describes herself as a model and actor, had sent the text messages published by the Mail on Sunday newspaper to a friend. The newspaper said the texts included offensive comments about black people and alleged that Markle would "taint" the royal family.

Marney apologized for the "shocking language," but said her words were taken out of context.

Following Saturday's no-confidence vote, the party said Gerard Batten will take over as interim leader and a leadership election would be held within 90 days.

The euroskeptic UKIP and its then-leader, Nigel Farage, were closely associated with Britain's June 2016 vote to leave the European Union. Since then, it has struggled to maintain its prominence and failed to win any Parliament seats during an election last year.

Some party members have suggested that Farage, a charismatic but divisive figure, could return to the helm. Farage stepped down in 2016 and worked to raise his international profile as the most prominent British supporter of Donald Trump's candidacy and presidency.

Bolton had said earlier that he thought "it's going to be very difficult for the party to survive" another round of leadership turmoil.

The party has financial problems, including a possible legal bill from a defamation case.

Weinstein Co. fires president after suit alleges inaction

The movie studio co-founded by Harvey Weinstein has fired its president, whose continued presence at the company was a source of controversy.

The Weinstein Co. board said Friday it voted unanimously to dismiss David Glasser. A statement announcing the firing was released to the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has said Glasser knew of allegations of sexual misconduct by Weinstein but failed to ensure they were investigated.

Schneiderman has sued the company and opposed one $500 million proposal to buy the studio that would not have guaranteed the ouster of top executives, including Glasser, who allegedly protected Weinstein.

The Weinstein Co. has not responded to a call for comment. Weinstein was ousted last year. He has denied nonconsensual sexual contact.

Vince Gill defends Grammys on female representation

Vince Gill defended the Recording Academy over the criticism that female artists were underrepresented at this year's Grammy Awards.

Gill said it is "impossible" to not leave someone off the list in a given year.

"I look at it kind of trying to see the whole field, you know. And I think the Grammys will go on and the country artists will feel slighted. Or maybe the classical people will feel slighted," Gill said. "It's impossible to pull something off like that and not leave a few people by the wayside."

The country star spoke before a benefit concert for the Country Music Hall of Fame on Tuesday in New York where he shared the stage with Emmylou Harris, Maren Morris, and Kesha.

Sitting with Harris and Morris before the concert, the 21-time Grammy winner said all that matters is that musical people are "conscious of what's great at the end of the day."

"You're looking at three really ope- minded musical people. We don't care about genres, of color of skin, or gender, or anything. We just love playing music with great people and that's all," he said.

Morris, who won her first Grammy last year, agreed, saying that the Grammys history backs it up.

"I think the person that's won the most Grammys is Alison Krauss so I don't know. I mean, there's obviously some things that need to be looked at, I think, and maybe it's just voting members. Maybe we need to like expand on that," Morris said.

Krauss has won 27 Grammys, and nominated 44 times. Krauss is actually tied for second place with Quincy Jones for most Grammy wins. Hungarian composer Georg Sorti holds the record with 31 wins.

Morris also cited another Grammy winner.

"I was really proud of Alessia Cara that she won best new artist. I think she really deserved that," Morris said. "But I think there's always improvement that needs to be had."

Harris admitted she was aware of the problems facing women in the recording industry, from sexual misconduct to unfair treatment, but doesn't count herself among those affected.

"I haven't run into a lot of the problems that I know are out there. But my path has been pretty unfettered with those kinds of things," Harris said.

The Recording Academy drew criticism for a variety of issues, including not having album of the year nominee Lorde perform on the live telecast last month. Also, of the awards shown on the broadcast, only two winners were women — Cara and Rihanna (for a collaboration with Kendrick Lamar).

Recording Academy CEO Neil Portnow intensified the situation, saying that women need to "step up" when asked about the lack of female winners backstage. He later said he misspoke.

Roger Deakins wins 4th ASC award. Is Oscar next?

Roger Deakins may be inching closer to making good on his 14th Oscar nomination after winning the American Society of Cinematographers' feature film award for "Blade Runner 2049."

His wife, James Deakins, accepted the award on her husband's behalf Saturday night, saying he was busy filming in New York. Roger Deakins has received ASC accolades before, but none translated into an Oscar.

His wife said he shares the award with his fellow nominees in the category, all of whom are also in contention for the cinematography Oscar next month.

Deakins beat out Bruno Delbonnel ("Darkest Hour"), Hoyte van Hoytema ("Dunkirk"), Dan Laustsen ("The Shape of Water") and Rachel Morrison ("Mudbound") to claim the ASC prize. Morrison is the first woman to compete in the organization's feature film category and the first woman nominated for cinematography in the 90-year history of the Academy Awards.

The ceremony at Hollywood & Highland's Ray Dolby Ballroom also recognized outstanding TV cinematography, where winners were "The Crown," ''Genius" and "12 Monkeys."

Angelina Jolie received the first award of the evening. Dean Semler, the cinematographer on her 2011 directorial debut, "In the Land of Blood and Honey," called Jolie "a true screen goddess" as he presented her with the Board of Governors Award.

"She's a great film director, wonderful actress, dedicated humanitarian, wonderful mother and a cinematographer's dream," Semler said, adding that Jolie has made an "indelible mark, not only on our industry but right across the whole planet."

Accepting the award, Jolie said she still feels "wonder at the privilege of being able to work as an artist," especially because for past generations of women, "the freedom to pursue art and ideas independently, on equal footing, was a bitter dream.

She credited Semler, Deakins and other cinematographers she's worked with as her directing teachers.

"I'm very grateful that I've never been made to feel like a female director, but that my job was to be a good director," Jolie said.

Gender was on the minds of many at the 32nd ASC Awards. The group's president noted that Morrison's ceiling-shattering nomination isn't "a fad" and asked the other female cinematographers in the room to stand. About two dozen did. But apart from Morrison, every nominee at the ASC Awards was male, and nearly all were white.

Presidents Award recipient Stephen Lighthill, head of the American Film Institute Conservatory's cinematography program since 2004, said the school will graduate its 99th female cinematographer under his tenure in June.

"My hope, though, is soon there will be no need to gender-identify us," he said.

Oscar-winning "Titanic" cinematographer Russell Carpenter received a lifetime achievement award, as did Alan Caso, who used his acceptance speech to talk about recognizing his own hypocrisy. He said he was complaining about what he saw as racism and sexism from the current political administration when he realized he'd spent decades surrounding himself "with an almost exclusively white and male crew."

"I have no excuse nor can I justify the many years I spent in a bubble, worrying only about myself," Caso said as he accepted the Career Achievement in Television Award. His many credits include "Dexter," ''Six Feet Under" and "Hawaii Five-O."

"I have sworn to myself that I will spend the remaining years of my career mentoring or kicking doors in for aspiring cinematographers who don't look like me," he said. "I'm appealing to my peers and my colleagues in this room tonight: You can avoid a moment like I'm having here, standing on a stage admitting you were blissfully asleep in a bubble of your own privilege for the majority of your career.

"Let's not only kick in some doors for members of minority groups, let's uninstall them for good."

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AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen is at www.twitter.com/YouKnowSandy .

___

For full coverage of awards season, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason .

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