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Céline Dion says her late husband is only man she’s ever kissed

In a recent interview with The Project, 49-year-old music legend Céline Dion got candid about the 2016 death of her husband and manager René Angélil.

Dion described what it felt like to lose Angélil — who died at age 73 after a cancer battle —after decades of marriage.

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“For three years, my husband did not have a sip of water or food. He was eating through a tube,” Dion said. “The only thing I hoped while he was in three years of agony: I wanted him to live in peace. I wanted him to feel so light and no worries. He had a little heart attack. It’s so quick; he didn’t even feel anything. I thought that he was like liberated from his pain.”

“He’s the only man I’ve seen. The only man I’ve loved. The only man I’ve kissed,” the Canadian added.

Angélil — with whom Dion shared sons René-Charles Angélil, 17, and twins Eddy and Nelson Angélil, 7 — died two days before his 74th birthday and days before the death of Dion’s brother, Daniel Dion. As Dion’s longtime music manager, Angélil had always had a role in her life personally and professionally.

Dion has a bronze replica of Angélil’s hand that she brings along to every one of her performances. With two Las Vegas residencies that combined have spanned well over a decade and counting, she’s had many performances with his hand in hers since his passing. 

Dion put her residency on hold during her husband’s bout with cancer, but it was Angélil’s constant support even through his illness that quickly led Dion back to the stage.

“I shake my husband’s hand and knock on wood with him every night before every show,” Dion, 49, told The Daily Telegraph. “Even after he’s gone, I still talk to him.”

A month before Angélil’s death, the longtime couple celebrated their 21st wedding anniversary.

“My husband wanted me to go back onstage before he passed; that’s what he wanted the most,” Dion said. “So I went back onstage while he was still alive; he wanted to make sure I could keep going. So I did prove to him (that), yes, I could keep going. I told him I’ve got the kids and that he’s got to trust me, he’s got to relax.

“He taught me so much. He did a great job; what he had been giving to me all his life and all my life will always be with me. He gave me his all. He mortgaged his house to pay for my first album. I guess before he left he wanted to make sure I was fine. I’m trying to prove to him every day I’m fine. Our kids are growing. We feel strong. We’re good.”

Native images in exhibit questions how America is defined

Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success.

The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington, D.C., describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River.

Provocative, yes, says the co-curator of the exhibit "Americans" that opened last month at the National Museum of the American Indian. Bold and visionary in imagining a country free of American Indians. A spectacular success in greatly expanding wealth from cotton fields where millions of blacks worked as slaves.

"When you're in the show, you understand bold and visionary become tongue in cheek," co-curator Cecile Ganteaume said.

The exhibit that runs through 2022 has opened to good reviews and pushes the national debate over American Indian imagery — including men in headdresses with bows, arrows and tomahawks — and sports teams named the Chiefs, Braves and Blackhawks. The NFL's Washington Redskins logo on one wall prompts visitors to think about why it's described both as a unifying force in D.C. and offensive.

The exhibit falls short, some say, with an accompanying website and its characterization of the Indian Removal Act.

The online text is a perplexing way to characterize an effort that spanned multiple presidencies and at one point, consumed one-fifth of the federal budget, said Ben Barnes, second chief of the Shawnee Tribe.

The law led to the deaths of thousands of people who were marched from their homes without full compensation for the value of the land they left behind. And it affected far more tribes than the five highlighted online, he said.

"It made it seem like it was a trivial matter that turned out best for everyone," he said. "I cannot imagine an exhibit at the newly established African-American museum that talked about how economically wonderful slavery was for the South."

Ganteaume said the website isn't encyclopedic and neither it nor the exhibit is meant to dismiss the experiences of American Indians. Instead, it challenges the depths at which people recognize indigenous people are ingrained in America's identity and learn how it happened, she said.

An opening gallery has hundreds of images of American Indians — often a stoic chief in a Plains-style headdress or a maiden — on alcohol bottles, a sugar bag, motor oil, a missile mounted on the wall and a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle.

Dozens of clips expand on how the imagery has permeated American culture in television and film.

But when historic or cartoonish images are the only perception people have of what it means to be Native, they can't imagine American Indians in the modern world, said Julie Reed, a history professor at the University of Tennessee.

"Even when I'm standing in front of students, identified as a Cherokee professor, making the point from Day 1 that I'm still here and other Cherokee people are still here, I still get midterm exams that talk about the complete annihilation of Indian peoples," she said.

Ganteaume said that while Native people have deep histories in other countries, the United States is more often fixated on using images of them.

Side galleries expand on what's familiar to most Americans: the Trail of Tears, Pocahontas and the Battle of Little Bighorn. An orientation film on the invention of Thanksgiving starts with a once widely used television screen test featuring an Indian head and then questions the hoopla of the national holiday when America already had Independence Day.

Eden Slone, a graduate student in museum studies in the Washington, D.C., area, said she was impressed by the exhibit's design and interactive touch tables. She never realized that Tootsie Pop wrappers featured an image of an American Indian in a headdress, holding a bow and arrow.

"I think the exhibition was carried out well and it definitely makes you think of Native American imagery," she said. "When I see images like that, I'll think more about where it came from."

Reed, University of Tennessee professor and Cherokee woman, fears people will get the wrong impression about the Indian Removal Act from the website. An essay puts a positive spin on what Reed calls ethnic cleansing.

Yet, she plans to visit.

"I think there is legitimacy to say, come look at this exhibit. That's a fair response to criticism," Reed said. "I want to go and give the exhibit a fair shake because it may be brilliant and could do everything the website does not."

London Fashion: Erdem shows fancy florals; Kane goes for sex

London Fashion Week saw a flurry of shows Monday emphasizing romance and femininity, often with exquisite workmanship and dashes of mystery and drama.

Dresses dominated the runway. Christopher Kane offered a strong collection of very feminine, sometimes very revealing dresses at his catwalk show at the Tate Britain museum.

Canada-born designer Erdem Moralioglu turned the National Portrait Gallery in Trafalgar Square into a showcase for his gorgeous contemporary designs, which featured long, elaborately made dresses, many with floral themes offset by a black background.

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CHRISTOPHER KANE CHANNELS 'THE JOY OF SEX'

Kane went "old school" for his London Fashion Week show with a collection that overtly referenced two 70s' classics: "The Joy of Sex" and "More Joy of Sex" books.

"I have never shied away from sex in the collections and this one is no different," said Kane. "Since the beginning, I have found it fundamental to our idea of women. Women with their own power who create their own worlds."

Anyone who missed the point was reminded by the none-too-subtle voiceover on the soundtrack encouraging people to experience more joy, more play and more sex.

Many of Kane's dresses were semi-sheer and lacy, in simple but effective blacks and reds, along with some relatively demure knitwear, including an impressive deep purple dress. Kane made very effective use of black set off with silver, as well as primarily black outfits that seemed to shimmer with color.

Pants were sometimes ripped or had fabric cut out and some blouses and dresses sported horizontal "peekaboo" slits. Kane used a wide variety of materials, including cotton canvas coats, raw wools and crushed velvet.

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CHECK THAT SECURITY

There was an unexpected evacuation of the Tate Britain Museum several hours before the Christopher Kane show, sending visitors — and models — into a light rain outside while security was checked.

The models were rained on for about 20 minutes before the security alert was lifted, creating some challenges for makeup artists and stylists preparing for his showcase event.

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ERDEM BUILDS ON A DELICATE, VEILED THEME

Erdem's London Fashion Week show made heavy use of veils — and black veil material — not only to shade the faces of many models but also as the fabric for leggings, long gloves and some shawls and capes.

The veil material was detailed with black polka dots that became a design motif throughout the show, giving the models an unearthly and sometimes off-putting look when their faces were totally obscured.

A few outfits had retro flair, including some silver metallic skirts that evoked the flapper era, and some fused Asian designs that gave the show an international feel. Colors were rich and vibrant and the floral designs were complex and evocative.

The show, with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour in her customary front-row seat, showed a remarkably uniform approach to design, each piece reinforcing and building on the look.

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BLAST FROM THE PAST: PAULINA PORIZKOVA RETURNS

Almost overlooked in the flood of attention paid to Christopher Bailey's farewell show at Burberry was the return of Czech-born Paulina Porizkova, one of the original supermodels.

She made a rare catwalk appearance Saturday to support designer Jiri Kalfar.

Photos: Kate Middleton wears dark green, not black at BAFTAs

Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton wore a dark green dress at the BAFTAs red carpet. Many other actresses wore black in solidarity with the  Times Up movement, which aims to end sexual harassment and gender discrimination.

French jazz violinist Didier Lockwood dies suddenly at 62

French jazz violinist Didier Lockwood, whose eclectic career spanned more than four decades and the world's most prestigious festivals and concert halls, has died. He was 62.

Lockwood's agent, Christophe Deghelt, said in a statement on Twitter that Lockwood died suddenly Sunday, a day after he performed in Paris.

President Emmanuel Macron paid tribute Monday to the musician he called a "friend and partner of the greatest" and said possessed "influence, open-mindedness and immense musical talent" that will be missed.

As a composer and an improviser while performing, Lockwood enjoyed crossing musical genres, from jazz-rock to classical. He was known for experimenting with different sounds on the electric violin.

He's survived by his wife, French soprano Patricia Petibon, and three daughters.

Duchess Catherine sparks outrage by not wearing black at BAFTAs

All eyes were on Duchess Catherine over the weekend when she attended the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, more commonly known as the BAFTA Awards. Kate Middleton, who is expecting her third child with the Duke of Cambridge, arrived at the Sunday event with Prince William.

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Much like award shows in the United States, attendees at the London event were encouraged to wear all black in support of the #MeToo and #TimesUp initiatives at this year’s BAFTAs, which are the British equivalent to the Oscars. 

Duchess Catherine opted for a green cap-sleeved gown and coordinating emerald accessories. She wore her hair down in her signature loose curls and carried a black clutch that matched her suede Prada heels. William wore a traditional black tuxedo for the evening.

Related: Photos: BAFTA Film Awards 2018 red carpet

The attire of the soon-to-be mom of three didn’t go unnoticed by Twitter users, who were quick to call her out for not supporting the movements by wearing black on the red carpet.

Catherine is expected to stay away from making any public political statements as a member of the royal family, though she has supported women’s issues when discussing mental health and motherhood.

“Nothing can really prepare you for you the sheer overwhelming experience of what it means to become a mother,” she said last year while introducing a film documentary on mental health and parenthood. 

“It is full of complex emotions of joy, exhaustion, love and worry, all mixed together. Your fundamental identity changes overnight,” she said. “You go from thinking of yourself as primarily an individual, to suddenly being a mother, first and foremost.”

Margot Robbie, Selma Hayek and Jennifer Lawrence were among the stars who wore black at this year’s awards show.

'Three Billboards' wins, women make waves at UK film awards

The ferocious female-led tragi-comedy "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" was the big winner at the British Academy Film Awards in London, where women demanding an end to harassment, abuse and inequality dominated the ceremony.

Martin McDonagh's film about a bereaved mother seeking justice won five trophies Sunday including best film, outstanding British film and best actress, for Frances McDormand.

Producer Graham Broadbent said the movie is "the story of a woman taking on the establishment and status quo."

"It seems more timely now than we could ever have imagined," he said.

Writer-director McDonagh said it was fitting, in the year of the "Time's Up" campaign against sexual harassment, that "Three Billboards" is "a film about a woman who refuses to take any s(asterisk)(asterisk)(asterisk) anymore."

"Our film is a hopeful one in lots of ways, but it's also an angry one," McDonagh said. "As we've seen this year, sometimes anger is the only way to get people to listen and to change."

McDonagh won the original screenplay prize for "Three Billboards," which also netted Sam Rockwell the supporting actor trophy. Allison Janney was named best supporting actress for playing ice skater Tonya Harding's domineering mother in "I, Tonya."

Guillermo del Toro won the directing prize for the monster fantasy "The Shape of Water," which also took trophies for music and production design.

Gary Oldman, the favorite among bookies, won the best actor prize for playing wartime British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in "Darkest Hour."

The British prizes, known as BAFTAs, are considered a key indicator of likely success at Hollywood's Oscars in two weeks' time.

The film awards season in the United States and elsewhere has been overshadowed by the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse leveled at scores of entertainment figures since women began coming forward to accuse Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein last year.

London's Old Vic Theatre has been rocked by allegations against former artistic director Kevin Spacey. London police are also investigating nine claims of sexual assault by Weinstein.

The red carpet and the auditorium at London's Royal Albert Hall were a sea of black, as actresses such as Lupita Nyong'o, Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lawrence and Margot Robbie eschewed color as a statement against sexual misconduct and gender inequality.

Several actresses brought feminist activists as guests, and men showed solidarity with "Time's Up" lapel pins.

McDormand opted to wear black and red rather than all black, and noted: "I have a little trouble with compliance."

"But I want you to know that I stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black," she said.

On the red carpet, actress Andrea Riseborough, who brought U.K. Black Pride founder Phyll Opoku-Gyimah as her guest, said she also hoped the film industry was on the road to greater equality and diversity.

"It's more likely we'll see an alien onscreen than we'll see an Asian woman at the moment, which is disgraceful," Riseborough said.

Prince William — the British Academy's president — and the Duchess of Cambridge were guests of honor at Sunday's ceremony, hosted by "Absolutely Fabulous" star Joanna Lumley. Kate acknowledged the evening's muted fashion by wearing a dark green Jenny Packham dress with black belt.

The call to wear black put Kate in a delicate position, because the royal family is careful to avoid political statements.

Ahead of the ceremony, almost 200 British women in entertainment called Sunday for an international movement to end sexual misconduct.

Kate Winslet, Emma Thompson, Naomie Harris, Emma Watson and Gemma Arterton were among signatories to a letter saying that 2018 should be "the year that time was up on sexual harassment and abuse."

The stars called for an end to impunity for abusers and announced a fund to support women and men battling workplace abuse, modeled on the "Time's Up" movement in the U.S. Former "Harry Potter" star Watson has given the fund 1 million pounds ($1.4 million), according to its page on the Go Fund Me website.

The BAFTA ceremony honored several generations of talent. Filmmaker James Ivory, 89, took the adapted screenplay prize for "Call Me By Your Name."

The 80-year-old director Ridley Scott, whose films include "Blade Runner," ''Alien," ''Thelma and Louise" and "Gladiator," received the academy's highest honor, the BAFTA Fellowship.

Daniel Kaluuya, the 28-year-old British star of "Get Out," won the rising star award and made a plea for public arts funding, which helped him get his start. Kaluuya, who is also Oscar-nominated, joked that success to him meant taking Ubers rather than the subway.

"I get that Prius everywhere," he said.

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For full coverage of awards season: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason

BAFTA Film Awards 2018: See the complete winners list

Check out which films, stars and directors won big Sunday at the 2018 British Academy Film Awards in London. 

>> PHOTOS: BAFTA Film Awards 2018 red carpet

  • Best film: "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"
  • Outstanding British film: "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"
  • Outstanding debut by a British writer, director or producer: "I Am Not a Witch," Rungano Nyoni (writer/director), Emily Morgan (producer)
  • Film not in the English language: "The Handmaiden"
  • Documentary: "I Am Not Your Negro"
  • Animated film: "Coco"
  • Director: "The Shape of Water," Guillermo del Toro
  • Original screenplay: "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri," Martin McDonagh
  • Adapted screenplay: "Call Me by Your Name," James Ivory
  • Leading actress: Frances McDormand, "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"
  • Leading actor: Gary Oldman, "Darkest Hour"
  • Supporting actress: Allison Janney, "I, Tonya"
  • Supporting actor: Sam Rockwell, "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"
  • Original music: "The Shape of Water," Alexandre Desplat
  • Cinematography: "Blade Runner 2049," Roger Deakins
  • Editing: "Baby Driver," Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss
  • Production design: "The Shape of Water," Paul Austerberry, Jeff Melvin, Shane Vieau
  • Costume design: "Phantom Thread," Mark Bridges
  • Makeup and hair: "Darkest Hour," David Malinowski, Ivana Primorac, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji
  • Sound: "Dunkirk," Alex Gibson, Richard King, Gregg Landaker, Gary A. Rizzo, Mark Weingarten
  • Special visual effects: "Blade Runner 2049," Richard R. Hoover, Paul Lambert, Gerd Nefzer, John Nelson
  • British short animation: "Poles apart," Paloma Baeza, Ser En Low
  • British short film: "Cowboy Dave," Colin O’Toole, Jonas Mortensen
  • EE rising star award (voted for by the public): Daniel Kaluuya
  • Fellowship: Sir Ridley Scott
  • Outstanding British contribution to cinema: National Film and Television School (NFTS)

>> Read more trending news 

Photos: BAFTA Film Awards 2018 red carpet

Kate Middleton, Lupita Nyong’o, Angelina Jolie, Margot Robbie, Jennifer Lawrence and other stars rocked the red carpet at the 2018 British Academy Film Awards in London.

Fergie's NBA All-Star Game national anthem confuses, amuses

Fergie tried something different with her national anthem at the NBA All-Star Game, and not everybody was cheering.

The Black Eyed Peas singer's slow, bluesy rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" on Sunday night wasn't particularly well received at Staples Center or on social media before the 67th edition of the NBA's annual showcase.

A low chuckle rumbled through the sold-out arena after Fergie finished the first line of the song with a throaty growl on "the dawn's early light."

Fans throughout the star-studded crowd reacted with varying levels of bemusement and enthusiasm while her languid, 2 ½-minute version of the song continued. Although Fergie was on pitch, her tempo, musical accompaniment and sexy delivery were not exactly typical for a sporting event or a patriotic song.

Golden State All-Star Draymond Green captured the mood — and became an instant GIF — when he was shown open-mouthed on the scoreboard and the television broadcast in apparent confusion over the unique vocal stylings. Green then chuckled to himself after realizing he was on TV.

After a forceful finish, Fergie finally got big cheers when she shouted, "Let's play some basketball!"

The Grammy Award-winning singer, born Stacy Ann Ferguson, is from nearby Hacienda Heights, California.

Famed basketball commentator Charles Barkley joked that he "needed a cigarette" after Fergie's performance during the TNT halftime show.

Former Lakers star Shaquille O'Neal leaped to Fergie's defense, saying: "Fergie, I love you. It was different. It was sexy. I liked it. Leave her alone."

Others on social media weren't as kind, with criticism of the performance outpacing the positive reviews.

The Forum in nearby Inglewood, California, was the site of arguably the most famous national anthem in sports history during another NBA All-Star Game 35 years ago.

Marvin Gaye's touching rhythm-and-blues version of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the 1983 game was initially criticized, but has since gained widespread acceptance as a groundbreaking musical performance.

Instead, Fergie is more likely to join the long list of curious versions of the anthem, even though she showed far more impressive vocal chops than the likes of Roseanne Barr or Carl Lewis.

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More AP basketball: www.apnews.com/tags/NBAbasketball

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